Negative cognition, affect, metacognition and dimensions of paranoia in people at ultra-high risk of psychosis: A multi-level modelling analysis

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/348653
Title:
Negative cognition, affect, metacognition and dimensions of paranoia in people at ultra-high risk of psychosis: A multi-level modelling analysis
Authors:
Morrison, Anthony P.; Shryane, Nick; Fowler, David; Birchwood, Max; Gumley, Andrew I.; Taylor, Hannah E.; French, Paul; Stewart, Suzanne L. K.; Jones, Peter B.; Lewis, Shôn W.; Bentall, Richard P.
Abstract:
Background: Paranoia is one of the commonest symptoms of psychosis but has rarely been studied in a population at risk of developing psychosis. Based on existing theoretical models, including the proposed distinction between ‘poor me’ and ‘bad me’ paranoia, we test specific predictions about associations between negative cognition, metacognitive beliefs and negative emotions and paranoid ideation and the belief that persecution is deserved (deservedness). Methods: We used data from 117 participants from the EDIE-2 trial of cognitive behaviour therapy for people at high risk of developing psychosis, comparing them with samples of psychiatric inpatients and healthy students from a previous study. Multi-level modelling was utilised to examine predictors of both paranoia and deservedness, with post-hoc planned comparisons conducted to test whether person-level predictor variables were associated differentially with paranoia or with deservedness. Results: Our sample of ARMS participants was not as paranoid, but reported higher levels of “bad-me” deservedness, compared to psychiatric inpatients. We found several predictors of paranoia and deservedness. Negative beliefs about self were related to deservedness but not paranoia, whereas negative beliefs about others were positively related to paranoia but negatively with deservedness. Both depression and negative metacognitive beliefs about paranoid thinking were specifically related to paranoia but not deservedness. Conclusions: This study provides evidence for the role of negative cognition, metacognition and negative affect in the development of paranoid beliefs, which has implications for psychological interventions and our understanding of psychosis.
Affiliation:
University of Manchester/Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust ; University of Manchester ; University of East Anglia ; University of Birmingham ; University of Glasgow ; University of Manchester ; University of Manchester/Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust ; University of Chester ; University of Cambridge ; University of Manchester ; University of Liverpool
Citation:
Morrison, A. P., Shryane, N., Fowler, D., Birchwood, M., Gumley, A. I., Taylor, H. E., . . . Bentall, R. P. (2015). Negative cognition, affect, metacognition and dimensions of paranoia in people at ultra-high risk of psychosis: a multi-level modelling analysis. Psychological Medicine, 45(12), 2675-2684. doi: doi:10.1017/S0033291715000689
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Journal:
Psychological Medicine
Publication Date:
8-Apr-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/348653
DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0029665115000063
Additional Links:
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is the authors' accepted manuscript of an article published in Psychological Medicine.
ISSN:
0033-2917
EISSN:
1469-8978
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Anthony P.en
dc.contributor.authorShryane, Nicken
dc.contributor.authorFowler, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorBirchwood, Maxen
dc.contributor.authorGumley, Andrew I.en
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Hannah E.en
dc.contributor.authorFrench, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Suzanne L. K.en
dc.contributor.authorJones, Peter B.en
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Shôn W.en
dc.contributor.authorBentall, Richard P.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-08T11:53:24Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-08T11:53:24Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04-08en
dc.identifier.citationMorrison, A. P., Shryane, N., Fowler, D., Birchwood, M., Gumley, A. I., Taylor, H. E., . . . Bentall, R. P. (2015). Negative cognition, affect, metacognition and dimensions of paranoia in people at ultra-high risk of psychosis: a multi-level modelling analysis. Psychological Medicine, 45(12), 2675-2684. doi: doi:10.1017/S0033291715000689en
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0029665115000063en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/348653en
dc.descriptionThis is the authors' accepted manuscript of an article published in Psychological Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Paranoia is one of the commonest symptoms of psychosis but has rarely been studied in a population at risk of developing psychosis. Based on existing theoretical models, including the proposed distinction between ‘poor me’ and ‘bad me’ paranoia, we test specific predictions about associations between negative cognition, metacognitive beliefs and negative emotions and paranoid ideation and the belief that persecution is deserved (deservedness). Methods: We used data from 117 participants from the EDIE-2 trial of cognitive behaviour therapy for people at high risk of developing psychosis, comparing them with samples of psychiatric inpatients and healthy students from a previous study. Multi-level modelling was utilised to examine predictors of both paranoia and deservedness, with post-hoc planned comparisons conducted to test whether person-level predictor variables were associated differentially with paranoia or with deservedness. Results: Our sample of ARMS participants was not as paranoid, but reported higher levels of “bad-me” deservedness, compared to psychiatric inpatients. We found several predictors of paranoia and deservedness. Negative beliefs about self were related to deservedness but not paranoia, whereas negative beliefs about others were positively related to paranoia but negatively with deservedness. Both depression and negative metacognitive beliefs about paranoid thinking were specifically related to paranoia but not deservedness. Conclusions: This study provides evidence for the role of negative cognition, metacognition and negative affect in the development of paranoid beliefs, which has implications for psychological interventions and our understanding of psychosis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen
dc.subjectparanoiaen
dc.titleNegative cognition, affect, metacognition and dimensions of paranoia in people at ultra-high risk of psychosis: A multi-level modelling analysisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1469-8978en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Manchester/Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust ; University of Manchester ; University of East Anglia ; University of Birmingham ; University of Glasgow ; University of Manchester ; University of Manchester/Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust ; University of Chester ; University of Cambridge ; University of Manchester ; University of Liverpoolen
dc.identifier.journalPsychological Medicineen
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