Subjective cues to deception/honesty in a high stakes situation: An exploratory approach

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/347422
Title:
Subjective cues to deception/honesty in a high stakes situation: An exploratory approach
Authors:
Wright Whelan, Clea; Wagstaff, Graham; Wheatcroft, Jacqueline M. ( 0000-0001-7212-1598 )
Abstract:
The low ecological validity of much of the research on deception detection is a limitation recognised by researchers in the field. Consequently, the present studies investigated subjective cues to deception using the real life, high stakes situation of people making public appeals for help with missing or murdered relatives. It was expected that cues related to affect would be particularly salient in this context. Study 1 was a qualitative investigation identifying cues to deception reportedly used by people accurate at detecting deception. Studies 2 and 3 were then empirical investigations which mainly employed the cues reported in Study 1. A number of subjective cues were found to discriminate between honest and deceptive appeals, including some previously unidentified cues, and cues likely to be context-specific. Most could be categorised under the themes of authenticity of emotion, and negative and positive affective reactions to the appealer. It is concluded that some cues to deception may emerge only in real life, high stakes situations; however, it is argued that some of these may be influenced by observers’ perceptions of the characteristics of offenders, rather than acts of deception per se.
Affiliation:
University of Chester ; University of Liverpool ; University of Liverpool
Citation:
Subjective cues to deception/honesty in a high stakes situation: An exploratory approach. The Journal of Psychology, 2015, 149(5), pp. 517-534. Appeared online 7 May 2014
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
The Journal of Psychology: Interdisciplinary and Applied
Publication Date:
7-May-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/347422
DOI:
10.1080/00223980.2014.911140
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/vjrl20#.VRvLwE10xFo; http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00223980.2014.911140
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Journal of Psychology: Interdisciplinary and Applied on 7/5/2014 available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00223980.2014.911140
ISSN:
0022-3980
EISSN:
1940-1019
Sponsors:
ESRC grant number ES/I90316X/1
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWright Whelan, Cleaen
dc.contributor.authorWagstaff, Grahamen
dc.contributor.authorWheatcroft, Jacqueline M.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-01T10:47:56Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-01T10:47:56Zen
dc.date.issued2014-05-07en
dc.identifier.citationSubjective cues to deception/honesty in a high stakes situation: An exploratory approach. The Journal of Psychology, 2015, 149(5), pp. 517-534. Appeared online 7 May 2014en
dc.identifier.issn0022-3980en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00223980.2014.911140en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/347422en
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Journal of Psychology: Interdisciplinary and Applied on 7/5/2014 available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00223980.2014.911140en
dc.description.abstractThe low ecological validity of much of the research on deception detection is a limitation recognised by researchers in the field. Consequently, the present studies investigated subjective cues to deception using the real life, high stakes situation of people making public appeals for help with missing or murdered relatives. It was expected that cues related to affect would be particularly salient in this context. Study 1 was a qualitative investigation identifying cues to deception reportedly used by people accurate at detecting deception. Studies 2 and 3 were then empirical investigations which mainly employed the cues reported in Study 1. A number of subjective cues were found to discriminate between honest and deceptive appeals, including some previously unidentified cues, and cues likely to be context-specific. Most could be categorised under the themes of authenticity of emotion, and negative and positive affective reactions to the appealer. It is concluded that some cues to deception may emerge only in real life, high stakes situations; however, it is argued that some of these may be influenced by observers’ perceptions of the characteristics of offenders, rather than acts of deception per se.en
dc.description.sponsorshipESRC grant number ES/I90316X/1en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/loi/vjrl20#.VRvLwE10xFoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00223980.2014.911140en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of Psychologyen
dc.subjectdeceptionen
dc.subjecthigh stakes liesen
dc.subjectlie detectionen
dc.titleSubjective cues to deception/honesty in a high stakes situation: An exploratory approachen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1940-1019en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester ; University of Liverpool ; University of Liverpoolen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Psychology: Interdisciplinary and Applieden
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