High stakes lies: Police and non-police accuracy in detecting deception

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/347362
Title:
High stakes lies: Police and non-police accuracy in detecting deception
Authors:
Wright Whelan, Clea; Wagstaff, Graham; Wheatcroft, Jacqueline M. ( 0000-0001-7212-1598 )
Abstract:
To date, the majority of investigations in to accuracy in detecting deception have used low stakes lies as stimulus materials, and findings from these studies suggest that people are generally poor at detecting deception. The research presented here utilised real life, high stakes lies as stimulus materials, to investigate the accuracy of police and non-police observers in detecting deception. It was hypothesised that both police and non-police observers would achieve above chance levels of accuracy in detecting deception, that police officers would be more accurate at detecting deception than non-police observers, that confidence in veracity judgements would be positively related to accuracy, and that consensus judgements would predict veracity. 107 observers (70 police officers and 37 non-police participants) watched 36 videos of people lying or telling the truth in an extremely high stakes, real life situation. Police observers achieved mean accuracy in detecting deception of 72%, non-police observers achieved 68% mean accuracy, and confidence in veracity judgements were positively related to accuracy. Consensus judgements correctly predicted veracity in 92% of cases.
Affiliation:
University of Chester ; University of Liverpool ; University of Liverpool
Citation:
High stakes lies: Police and non-police accuracy in detecting deception, Psychology, Crime & Law, 2014, 21(2), pp.127-138
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Psychology, Crime & Law
Publication Date:
26-Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/347362
DOI:
10.1080/1068316X.2014.935777
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gpcl20/current#.VRqvEE10xFo; http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1068316X.2014.935777
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Psychology, Crime and Law on 26 June 2014 available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/1068316X.2014.935777
ISSN:
1068-316X
EISSN:
1477-2744
Sponsors:
ESRC grant number ES/I013288/1
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWright Whelan, Cleaen
dc.contributor.authorWagstaff, Grahamen
dc.contributor.authorWheatcroft, Jacqueline M.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-31T14:29:54Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-31T14:29:54Zen
dc.date.issued2014-06-26en
dc.identifier.citationHigh stakes lies: Police and non-police accuracy in detecting deception, Psychology, Crime & Law, 2014, 21(2), pp.127-138en
dc.identifier.issn1068-316Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1068316X.2014.935777en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/347362en
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Psychology, Crime and Law on 26 June 2014 available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/1068316X.2014.935777en
dc.description.abstractTo date, the majority of investigations in to accuracy in detecting deception have used low stakes lies as stimulus materials, and findings from these studies suggest that people are generally poor at detecting deception. The research presented here utilised real life, high stakes lies as stimulus materials, to investigate the accuracy of police and non-police observers in detecting deception. It was hypothesised that both police and non-police observers would achieve above chance levels of accuracy in detecting deception, that police officers would be more accurate at detecting deception than non-police observers, that confidence in veracity judgements would be positively related to accuracy, and that consensus judgements would predict veracity. 107 observers (70 police officers and 37 non-police participants) watched 36 videos of people lying or telling the truth in an extremely high stakes, real life situation. Police observers achieved mean accuracy in detecting deception of 72%, non-police observers achieved 68% mean accuracy, and confidence in veracity judgements were positively related to accuracy. Consensus judgements correctly predicted veracity in 92% of cases.en
dc.description.sponsorshipESRC grant number ES/I013288/1en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gpcl20/current#.VRqvEE10xFoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1068316X.2014.935777en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Psychology, Crime & Lawen
dc.subjectdeception detectionen
dc.subjecthigh stakes liesen
dc.subjectlie detectionen
dc.titleHigh stakes lies: Police and non-police accuracy in detecting deceptionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1477-2744en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester ; University of Liverpool ; University of Liverpoolen
dc.identifier.journalPsychology, Crime & Lawen
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