Moving towards person‐centred weight management: A literature review of factors affecting engagement and retention in community‐based, multi‐component, group lifestyle weight management interventions in the United Kingdom

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/347359
Title:
Moving towards person‐centred weight management: A literature review of factors affecting engagement and retention in community‐based, multi‐component, group lifestyle weight management interventions in the United Kingdom
Authors:
Williamson, Kathryn
Abstract:
Weight management programmes commonly experience high attrition rates, reducing both effectiveness and efficiency. Reasons for attrition remain unclear. Evaluating participant experience promotes identification of improvements not obvious to service providers, developing a more person‐centred service, whilst potentially reducing attrition. Aim of review: To explore factors impacting engagement and attrition of non‐commercial group based lifestyle weight management programmes in the UK, with specific reference to qualitative evaluations of participant experience. Data sources: Electronic databases (PubMed, PsychINFO) and reference lists of relevant studies were searched. Findings: Five different interventions, all including participant evaluation, were identified. Heterogeneity between studies prevented definitive conclusions. Targeted interventions, use of social marketing, pre‐intervention assessment and an integrated physical activity component all potentially promote effectiveness, person‐centred delivery and reduce attrition. Impact of group leader background appears negligible. Non‐completers views are rarely evaluated. Conclusion: UK group‐based weight management programmes are evolving away from a onesize‐fits‐all health professional delivery model. Further research on effectiveness, attrition and person‐centred delivery is required. Work on accessing noncompleters views needs prioritised.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
26-Sep-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/347359
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, Kathrynen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-31T13:51:42Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-31T13:51:42Zen
dc.date.issued2014-09-26en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/347359en
dc.description.abstractWeight management programmes commonly experience high attrition rates, reducing both effectiveness and efficiency. Reasons for attrition remain unclear. Evaluating participant experience promotes identification of improvements not obvious to service providers, developing a more person‐centred service, whilst potentially reducing attrition. Aim of review: To explore factors impacting engagement and attrition of non‐commercial group based lifestyle weight management programmes in the UK, with specific reference to qualitative evaluations of participant experience. Data sources: Electronic databases (PubMed, PsychINFO) and reference lists of relevant studies were searched. Findings: Five different interventions, all including participant evaluation, were identified. Heterogeneity between studies prevented definitive conclusions. Targeted interventions, use of social marketing, pre‐intervention assessment and an integrated physical activity component all potentially promote effectiveness, person‐centred delivery and reduce attrition. Impact of group leader background appears negligible. Non‐completers views are rarely evaluated. Conclusion: UK group‐based weight management programmes are evolving away from a onesize‐fits‐all health professional delivery model. Further research on effectiveness, attrition and person‐centred delivery is required. Work on accessing noncompleters views needs prioritised.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectweight managementen
dc.subjectperson-centred approachen
dc.titleMoving towards person‐centred weight management: A literature review of factors affecting engagement and retention in community‐based, multi‐component, group lifestyle weight management interventions in the United Kingdomen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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