Elvis’ Gospel music: Between the secular and the spiritual?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/347319
Title:
Elvis’ Gospel music: Between the secular and the spiritual?
Authors:
Duffett, Mark
Abstract:
Do fans sanctify their heroes? In the past, I have argued that Elvis fandom is not a neo-religious practice but that attention to a modified version of Durkheim’s theory of religion can, nevertheless, help to explain it as a form of social interaction. I take that argument further here, first by revealing the ethical and analytical advantages of neo-Durkheimian theory, then by pitting this theory against three aspects of Elvis’ sincere engagement with gospel music. Elvis Presley won three Grammy awards for his gospel albums and was the musician who did most to bring the gospel quartet tradition to the mainstream. His eclectic personal ties to spirituality and religion have become a focus of debate within his fan culture. They offer a set of discursive resources through which to explain the emotional impact and social influence of his music. If star musicians are positioned as centres of attention, what happens when they use their privileged position in the spotlight to offer a “spiritual” message?
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Elvis’ Gospel music: Between the secular and the spiritual, Religions, 2015, 6(1), pp. 182-203
Publisher:
MDPI
Journal:
Religions
Publication Date:
9-Mar-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/347319
DOI:
10.3390/rel6010182
Additional Links:
http://www.mdpi.com/journal/religions; http://www.mdpi.com/2077-1444/6/1/182/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
2077-1444
Appears in Collections:
Media

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDuffett, Marken
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-30T13:48:09Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-30T13:48:09Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03-09en
dc.identifier.citationElvis’ Gospel music: Between the secular and the spiritual, Religions, 2015, 6(1), pp. 182-203en
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/rel6010182en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/347319en
dc.description.abstractDo fans sanctify their heroes? In the past, I have argued that Elvis fandom is not a neo-religious practice but that attention to a modified version of Durkheim’s theory of religion can, nevertheless, help to explain it as a form of social interaction. I take that argument further here, first by revealing the ethical and analytical advantages of neo-Durkheimian theory, then by pitting this theory against three aspects of Elvis’ sincere engagement with gospel music. Elvis Presley won three Grammy awards for his gospel albums and was the musician who did most to bring the gospel quartet tradition to the mainstream. His eclectic personal ties to spirituality and religion have become a focus of debate within his fan culture. They offer a set of discursive resources through which to explain the emotional impact and social influence of his music. If star musicians are positioned as centres of attention, what happens when they use their privileged position in the spotlight to offer a “spiritual” message?en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/journal/religionsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/2077-1444/6/1/182/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Religionsen
dc.subjectElvisen
dc.subjecttotemismen
dc.subjectgospel musicen
dc.subjectDurkheimen
dc.subjectfandomen
dc.subjectspiritualityen
dc.titleElvis’ Gospel music: Between the secular and the spiritual?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2077-1444en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalReligionsen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.