Keeping it in the family: Refocusing household sustainability

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/347316
Title:
Keeping it in the family: Refocusing household sustainability
Authors:
Collins, Rebecca
Abstract:
Recent research on how best to support the development of pro-environmental behaviours has pointed towards the household as the scale at which interventions might be most effectively targeted. While pro-environmental behaviour research has tended to focus on the actions of adults, almost one-third of UK households also include children and teenagers. Some research has suggested that young people are particularly adept at exerting influence on the ways in which the household as a whole consumes. Yet this influence is not only one-way; parents continue to have direct input into the ways in which their children relate to and interact with the objects of consumption (such as personal possessions) through routine processes including acquisition, use, keeping and ridding. In this paper I draw on qualitative research with British teenagers to highlight how young people and their parents interact when managing household material consumption. I use this discussion to suggest that promoters of sustainability might increase the efficacy of their efforts by engaging households as complex family units, where individual household members’ distinct priorities are linked by shared familial values, and where family-based group identity is used to encourage shared commitment to lower-impact living.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Geoforum, 2015, 60(1), pp. 22-32
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Geoforum
Publication Date:
24-Jan-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/347316
DOI:
10.1016/j.geoforum.2015.01.006
Additional Links:
http://www.journals.elsevier.com/geoforum/; http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001671851500007X
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Geoforum. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Geoforum, 2015, 60(1), pp. 22-32 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2015.01.006
ISSN:
0016-7185
Sponsors:
The research reported in this paper was funded by the ESCR, grant no. ES/GO17581/1.
Appears in Collections:
Geography and Development Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Rebeccaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-30T13:34:09Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-30T13:34:09Zen
dc.date.issued2015-01-24en
dc.identifier.citationGeoforum, 2015, 60(1), pp. 22-32en
dc.identifier.issn0016-7185en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.geoforum.2015.01.006en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/347316en
dc.descriptionNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Geoforum. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Geoforum, 2015, 60(1), pp. 22-32 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2015.01.006en
dc.description.abstractRecent research on how best to support the development of pro-environmental behaviours has pointed towards the household as the scale at which interventions might be most effectively targeted. While pro-environmental behaviour research has tended to focus on the actions of adults, almost one-third of UK households also include children and teenagers. Some research has suggested that young people are particularly adept at exerting influence on the ways in which the household as a whole consumes. Yet this influence is not only one-way; parents continue to have direct input into the ways in which their children relate to and interact with the objects of consumption (such as personal possessions) through routine processes including acquisition, use, keeping and ridding. In this paper I draw on qualitative research with British teenagers to highlight how young people and their parents interact when managing household material consumption. I use this discussion to suggest that promoters of sustainability might increase the efficacy of their efforts by engaging households as complex family units, where individual household members’ distinct priorities are linked by shared familial values, and where family-based group identity is used to encourage shared commitment to lower-impact living.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research reported in this paper was funded by the ESCR, grant no. ES/GO17581/1.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journals.elsevier.com/geoforum/en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001671851500007Xen
dc.subjectfamilyen
dc.subjectidentityen
dc.subjectyoung peopleen
dc.subjectsustainabilityen
dc.subjectconsumptionen
dc.subjectdivestmenten
dc.titleKeeping it in the family: Refocusing household sustainabilityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalGeoforumen
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