Imitation and finitude: Towards a Jewish theology of making

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/346114
Title:
Imitation and finitude: Towards a Jewish theology of making
Authors:
Vincent, Alana M.
Abstract:
It has long been taken as a truism that Judaism as a whole is marked by a pervasive “hostility to the image”. The prevailing narrative takes the Second Commandment very much at face value, as a prohibition against the attempt to imitate anything in the heavens above, on the earth below, or in the waters under the earth. However, this narrative is based on an incomplete understanding of the textual and artefact record. This paper takes more recent scholarship into account, and attempts to contest this narrative, and to suggest that we can identify a Jewish tradition not just of visuality, but of art, and that, further, we can get there with the help of, rather than in spite of, the biblical text. It engages with a reading of the last third of the book of Exodus, weighing the duelling narratives of Bezalel and the Golden Calf against the theories of art which have risen to prominence in the modern era, attempting to formulate the basis for a Jewish theological aesthetics which affirms and embraces the visual arts.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
In C. Welz (Ed.), The ethics of in-visibility: Imago Dei, memory, and the prohibition of images (pp. 87-100). Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2015.
Publisher:
Mohr Siebeck
Publication Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/346114
Additional Links:
http://www.mohr.de
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
This book chapter is not available through ChesterRep.
Series/Report no.:
Religion in Philosophy and Theology
ISBN:
9783161538100
Appears in Collections:
Theology and Religious Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVincent, Alana M.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-04T12:11:52Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-04T12:11:52Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationIn C. Welz (Ed.), The ethics of in-visibility: Imago Dei, memory, and the prohibition of images (pp. 87-100). Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2015.en
dc.identifier.isbn9783161538100en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/346114en
dc.descriptionThis book chapter is not available through ChesterRep.en
dc.description.abstractIt has long been taken as a truism that Judaism as a whole is marked by a pervasive “hostility to the image”. The prevailing narrative takes the Second Commandment very much at face value, as a prohibition against the attempt to imitate anything in the heavens above, on the earth below, or in the waters under the earth. However, this narrative is based on an incomplete understanding of the textual and artefact record. This paper takes more recent scholarship into account, and attempts to contest this narrative, and to suggest that we can identify a Jewish tradition not just of visuality, but of art, and that, further, we can get there with the help of, rather than in spite of, the biblical text. It engages with a reading of the last third of the book of Exodus, weighing the duelling narratives of Bezalel and the Golden Calf against the theories of art which have risen to prominence in the modern era, attempting to formulate the basis for a Jewish theological aesthetics which affirms and embraces the visual arts.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMohr Siebecken
dc.relation.ispartofseriesReligion in Philosophy and Theologyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mohr.deen
dc.subjectJewish theologyen
dc.subjectsecond commandmenten
dc.subjectidolatryen
dc.subjecttheory of arten
dc.titleImitation and finitude: Towards a Jewish theology of makingen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
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