Cyclists and conflicts over road use in Britain, 1926-1935

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/346111
Title:
Cyclists and conflicts over road use in Britain, 1926-1935
Authors:
Cox, Peter
Abstract:
Increasing conflict over the use of road space in Britain during the 1930s can be seen in the rapid growth of casualty figures. In particular, concerns were raised over the rising number of cyclists’ deaths as part of the overall numbers. Reports and comments in Parliament, coroners’ reports and newspapers placing responsibility for road safety on non-motorised road users led to considerable reaction from cycle users and, ultimately, to the formation of a vociferous campaign group uniting previously disparate factions and interests from cycle users, sporting clubs and industry. Drawing on contemporary sources, in particular on the coverage of the conflict by the Cyclists’ Touring Club, and on parliamentary debate surrounding the 1930 and 1934 Road Traffic Acts, this paper examines the discursive production of cyclists as a previously invisible body of road users. It considers the complexities of the conflict over road safety and the location of responsibility for road safety in terms of class, representation, power and status of the groups of actors in relation to the governance of road space. The arguments over legitimacy and safety produced by the conflicting interests of different road user groups articulated in this period continue to have significant bearing on transport policy and practice today. This is especially the case given recent renewed interest in promoting cycling as a sustainable mode of urban mobility and the often vociferous debate between advocates of separate infrastructure and supporters of integrated road use
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
In G. Duc, O. Perroux, H. Schiedt, & F. Walter, (Eds.), Histoire des transports et de la mobilité: Entre concurrence modale et coordination (de 1918 à nos jours) (pp.279-305). Neuchâtel , Switzerland: Editions Alphil
Publisher:
Editions Alphil
Publication Date:
2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/346111
Additional Links:
http://alphil.com
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
This book chapter is not available through ChesterRep.
ISBN:
9782940489541
Appears in Collections:
Social and Political Science

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCox, Peteren
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-04T11:31:35Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-04T11:31:35Zen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationIn G. Duc, O. Perroux, H. Schiedt, & F. Walter, (Eds.), Histoire des transports et de la mobilité: Entre concurrence modale et coordination (de 1918 à nos jours) (pp.279-305). Neuchâtel , Switzerland: Editions Alphilen
dc.identifier.isbn9782940489541en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/346111en
dc.descriptionThis book chapter is not available through ChesterRep.en
dc.description.abstractIncreasing conflict over the use of road space in Britain during the 1930s can be seen in the rapid growth of casualty figures. In particular, concerns were raised over the rising number of cyclists’ deaths as part of the overall numbers. Reports and comments in Parliament, coroners’ reports and newspapers placing responsibility for road safety on non-motorised road users led to considerable reaction from cycle users and, ultimately, to the formation of a vociferous campaign group uniting previously disparate factions and interests from cycle users, sporting clubs and industry. Drawing on contemporary sources, in particular on the coverage of the conflict by the Cyclists’ Touring Club, and on parliamentary debate surrounding the 1930 and 1934 Road Traffic Acts, this paper examines the discursive production of cyclists as a previously invisible body of road users. It considers the complexities of the conflict over road safety and the location of responsibility for road safety in terms of class, representation, power and status of the groups of actors in relation to the governance of road space. The arguments over legitimacy and safety produced by the conflicting interests of different road user groups articulated in this period continue to have significant bearing on transport policy and practice today. This is especially the case given recent renewed interest in promoting cycling as a sustainable mode of urban mobility and the often vociferous debate between advocates of separate infrastructure and supporters of integrated road useen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEditions Alphilen
dc.relation.urlhttp://alphil.comen
dc.subjectcycling and societyen
dc.subjectclass conflicten
dc.subjectroad safetyen
dc.titleCyclists and conflicts over road use in Britain, 1926-1935en
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
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