Beliefs about weight and breast cancer: An interview study with high risk women following a 12 month weight loss intervention

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/345145
Title:
Beliefs about weight and breast cancer: An interview study with high risk women following a 12 month weight loss intervention
Authors:
Wright, Claire E.; Harvie, Michelle N.; Howell, Anthony; Evans, D. Gareth; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.; Donnelly, Louise S.
Abstract:
Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK. Lifestyle factors including excess weight contribute to risk of developing the disease. Whilst the exact links between weight and breast cancer are still emerging, it is imperative to explore how women understand these links and if these beliefs impact on successful behaviour change. Overweight/obese premenopausal women (aged 35–45) with a family history of breast cancer (lifetime risk 17–40%) were invited to a semi-structured interview following their participation in a 12 month weight loss intervention aimed at reducing their risk of breast cancer. Interviews were carried out with 9 women who successfully achieved ≥5% weight loss and 11 who were unsuccessful. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes were developed from the analysis. The first theme how women construct and understand links between weight and breast cancer risk is composed of two subthemes, the construction of weight and breast cancer risk and making sense of weight and breast cancer risk. The second theme - motivation and adherence to weight loss interventions - explains that breast cancer risk can be a motivating factor for adherence to a weight loss intervention. The final theme, acceptance of personal responsibility for health is composed of two subthemes responsibility for one’s own health and responsibility for family health through making sensible lifestyle choices.Beliefs about weight and breast cancer risk were informed by social networks, media reports and personal experiences of significant others diagnosed with breast cancer. Our study has highlighted common doubts, anxieties and questions and the importance of providing a credible rationale for weight control and weight loss which addresses individual concerns.
Affiliation:
University of Chester ; University Hospital of South Manchester ; University Hospital of South Manchester ; University of Manchester ; University of Chester ; University Hospital of South Manchester
Citation:
Beliefs about weight and breast cancer: An interview study with high risk women following a 12 month weight loss intervention. Hereditary Cancer in Clinical Practice, 2015, 13 (1)
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Journal:
Hereditary Cancer in Clinical Practice
Publication Date:
9-Jan-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/345145
DOI:
10.1186/s13053-014-0023-9
Additional Links:
http://www.hccpjournal.com/; http://www.hccpjournal.com/content/13/1/1
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Version of Record of an article published by BioMed Central in Hereditary Cancer in Clinical Practice on 9 January 2015, available online: http://www.hccpjournal.com/content/13/1/1 This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
ISSN:
1897-4287
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWright, Claire E.en
dc.contributor.authorHarvie, Michelle N.en
dc.contributor.authorHowell, Anthonyen
dc.contributor.authorEvans, D. Garethen
dc.contributor.authorHulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.en
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Louise S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-24T09:51:48Zen
dc.date.available2015-02-24T09:51:48Zen
dc.date.issued2015-01-09en
dc.identifier.citationBeliefs about weight and breast cancer: An interview study with high risk women following a 12 month weight loss intervention. Hereditary Cancer in Clinical Practice, 2015, 13 (1)en
dc.identifier.issn1897-4287en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13053-014-0023-9en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/345145en
dc.descriptionThis is an Version of Record of an article published by BioMed Central in Hereditary Cancer in Clinical Practice on 9 January 2015, available online: http://www.hccpjournal.com/content/13/1/1 This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.en
dc.description.abstractBreast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK. Lifestyle factors including excess weight contribute to risk of developing the disease. Whilst the exact links between weight and breast cancer are still emerging, it is imperative to explore how women understand these links and if these beliefs impact on successful behaviour change. Overweight/obese premenopausal women (aged 35–45) with a family history of breast cancer (lifetime risk 17–40%) were invited to a semi-structured interview following their participation in a 12 month weight loss intervention aimed at reducing their risk of breast cancer. Interviews were carried out with 9 women who successfully achieved ≥5% weight loss and 11 who were unsuccessful. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes were developed from the analysis. The first theme how women construct and understand links between weight and breast cancer risk is composed of two subthemes, the construction of weight and breast cancer risk and making sense of weight and breast cancer risk. The second theme - motivation and adherence to weight loss interventions - explains that breast cancer risk can be a motivating factor for adherence to a weight loss intervention. The final theme, acceptance of personal responsibility for health is composed of two subthemes responsibility for one’s own health and responsibility for family health through making sensible lifestyle choices.Beliefs about weight and breast cancer risk were informed by social networks, media reports and personal experiences of significant others diagnosed with breast cancer. Our study has highlighted common doubts, anxieties and questions and the importance of providing a credible rationale for weight control and weight loss which addresses individual concerns.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hccpjournal.com/en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hccpjournal.com/content/13/1/1en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Hereditary Cancer in Clinical Practiceen
dc.subjectbreast canceren
dc.subjectrisk reduction behaviouren
dc.subjectqualitativeen
dc.subjectoncologyen
dc.subjecthereditaryen
dc.subjectbody weighten
dc.subjectinterviewsen
dc.titleBeliefs about weight and breast cancer: An interview study with high risk women following a 12 month weight loss interventionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester ; University Hospital of South Manchester ; University Hospital of South Manchester ; University of Manchester ; University of Chester ; University Hospital of South Manchesteren
dc.identifier.journalHereditary Cancer in Clinical Practiceen
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