Ethical thinking in a disciplinary context: The ethical development of undergraduates and expectations of tutors in the arts, social and pure sciences

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/344818
Title:
Ethical thinking in a disciplinary context: The ethical development of undergraduates and expectations of tutors in the arts, social and pure sciences
Authors:
Healey, Ruth L. ( 0000-0001-6872-4900 )
Abstract:
Barnett (2000: 257) argues that universities need to prepare students for ‘supercomplexity’, where “the very frameworks by which we orientate ourselves to the world are themselves contested”. Learning to think through ethical issues develops critical thinking skills for dealing with supercomplexity, since the frameworks students use to consider ethical issues are contested and likely to change. This research explores disciplinary variations in the development of undergraduates’ ethical thinking during their programmes and compares how this aligns with the expectations of their tutors. Interviews were conducted with tutors teaching on the English, Geography and Animal Behaviour and Welfare programmes at an English University and a questionnaire was completed by 335 students studying on these programmes. It was found that across the disciplines tutors have similar expectations in terms of the nature of ethical thinking desired but that most of the students exhibit lower levels of ethical development than their tutors expected.
Publication Date:
23-Feb-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/344818
Language:
en
Description:
Unpublished conference presentation given at the Society for Research into Higher Education conference 2013 at Celtic Manor, Newport, 11 December 2013.
Appears in Collections:
Geography and Development Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealey, Ruth L.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-23T15:56:29Zen
dc.date.available2015-02-23T15:56:29Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02-23en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/344818en
dc.descriptionUnpublished conference presentation given at the Society for Research into Higher Education conference 2013 at Celtic Manor, Newport, 11 December 2013.en
dc.description.abstractBarnett (2000: 257) argues that universities need to prepare students for ‘supercomplexity’, where “the very frameworks by which we orientate ourselves to the world are themselves contested”. Learning to think through ethical issues develops critical thinking skills for dealing with supercomplexity, since the frameworks students use to consider ethical issues are contested and likely to change. This research explores disciplinary variations in the development of undergraduates’ ethical thinking during their programmes and compares how this aligns with the expectations of their tutors. Interviews were conducted with tutors teaching on the English, Geography and Animal Behaviour and Welfare programmes at an English University and a questionnaire was completed by 335 students studying on these programmes. It was found that across the disciplines tutors have similar expectations in terms of the nature of ethical thinking desired but that most of the students exhibit lower levels of ethical development than their tutors expected.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectethicsen
dc.subjectdisciplineen
dc.subjectethical thinkingen
dc.subjectcritical thinkingen
dc.titleEthical thinking in a disciplinary context: The ethical development of undergraduates and expectations of tutors in the arts, social and pure sciencesen
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.srhe.ac.uk/conference2013/en
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