The effects of different stretch protocols on vertical jump, speed, and hamstring flexibility in elite female camogie players

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/344440
Title:
The effects of different stretch protocols on vertical jump, speed, and hamstring flexibility in elite female camogie players
Authors:
Connor, John
Abstract:
At this time there is very little data available on the training and conditioning of Camogie (Ladies Hurling) players. A warm-up is an important part of preparation for a Camogie match (Young, 2007). Stretching is typically part of the warm-up, however, debate exists as to the most suitable type of stretching to perform. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of dynamic stretching (DS) and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching on physical performance markers in elite Camogie players. Participants attended three separate testing dates (approximately one week between sessions). Each session lasted approximately an hour. Participants completed tests on vertical jump, 20 metre sprint and sit-and-reach after a sports specific warm-up followed by one of the interventions. Week 1 testing was the control with weeks 2 and 3 being DS and PNF respectively. There was a significant difference (p = .019) between the dynamic group (18.09 inches) and the PNF group (17.56 inches) in vertical jump heights. There was a significant difference (p = .006) between the control group (3.39s) and the PNF group (3.55s) on the 20 metre sprint test. There was a significant difference (p = .00) between the PNF group (3.55s) and dynamic group (3.39s) on the 20 metre sprint test. There was a significant difference (p < .001) between the control group (26.25 inches) and the PNF group (27.58 inches) on the sit-and reach test. There was a significant difference (p = .043) between the control group (26.25 inches) and the dynamic group (27.08 inches) on the sit-and-reach test. There were no significant differences on any other tests. This data shows that stretching can affect performance markers in elite Camogie players. Flexibility was improved by both interventions. PNF was detrimental to performance compared to the control in 20 metre sprint tests. PNF also caused a drop in performance compared to DS on the vertical jump. If the goal is increased flexibility then either intervention can be beneficial but neither intervention showed improved performances and in some cases performance was worse.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Sep-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/344440
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorConnor, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-13T14:25:40Zen
dc.date.available2015-02-13T14:25:40Zen
dc.date.issued2014-09en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/344440en
dc.description.abstractAt this time there is very little data available on the training and conditioning of Camogie (Ladies Hurling) players. A warm-up is an important part of preparation for a Camogie match (Young, 2007). Stretching is typically part of the warm-up, however, debate exists as to the most suitable type of stretching to perform. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of dynamic stretching (DS) and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching on physical performance markers in elite Camogie players. Participants attended three separate testing dates (approximately one week between sessions). Each session lasted approximately an hour. Participants completed tests on vertical jump, 20 metre sprint and sit-and-reach after a sports specific warm-up followed by one of the interventions. Week 1 testing was the control with weeks 2 and 3 being DS and PNF respectively. There was a significant difference (p = .019) between the dynamic group (18.09 inches) and the PNF group (17.56 inches) in vertical jump heights. There was a significant difference (p = .006) between the control group (3.39s) and the PNF group (3.55s) on the 20 metre sprint test. There was a significant difference (p = .00) between the PNF group (3.55s) and dynamic group (3.39s) on the 20 metre sprint test. There was a significant difference (p < .001) between the control group (26.25 inches) and the PNF group (27.58 inches) on the sit-and reach test. There was a significant difference (p = .043) between the control group (26.25 inches) and the dynamic group (27.08 inches) on the sit-and-reach test. There were no significant differences on any other tests. This data shows that stretching can affect performance markers in elite Camogie players. Flexibility was improved by both interventions. PNF was detrimental to performance compared to the control in 20 metre sprint tests. PNF also caused a drop in performance compared to DS on the vertical jump. If the goal is increased flexibility then either intervention can be beneficial but neither intervention showed improved performances and in some cases performance was worse.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectstretch protocolsen
dc.subjectcamogieen
dc.titleThe effects of different stretch protocols on vertical jump, speed, and hamstring flexibility in elite female camogie playersen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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