A qualitative exploration into the impact that working as a nurse in a children's hospice has on one's thoughts and feelings surrounding personal mortality

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/344055
Title:
A qualitative exploration into the impact that working as a nurse in a children's hospice has on one's thoughts and feelings surrounding personal mortality
Authors:
Livesey, Catherine S. R.
Abstract:
This research study explores four nurse’s experiences of working in a children’s hospice and uncovers hospice experiences that contribute to personal mortality exploration. The study investigates how these experiences impact the nurses’ thoughts and feelings surrounding their comprehension of their own life and death. The study addresses if a counselling service would be viewed as a beneficial resource in supporting hospice nurses explore their mortality, and where appropriate, also offers recommendations for additional emotional support for nurses. The study is qualitative in nature and uses Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) as its mode of inquiry and analysis. Following interviews, transcription took place before carrying out a detailed analysis of the data. The study revealed that the nurses hold extensive knowledge in their field of work and possess a considerable appreciation of their own mortality. However, there was a clear avoidance for most of the participants in discussing personal mortality in any significant emotional depth. A reoccurring link was discovered between being a children’s hospice nurse and the mortality of the nurses’ own children. This link proved to provoke the most significant emotional response within the nurses. Finally the research found that children’s hospice nurses would find a staff counselling service beneficial to support them in their role. The study concludes that further research into the link between children’s hospice nursing and personal mortality wishes would be helpful in creating a solid body of literature within this field. It is also suggested that research with hospice nurses who have been witness to what they perceive as ‘traumatic’ experiences and whom have engaged in counselling as a result of these traumas may be another area worthy of research.
Advisors:
Gubi, Peter M.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Nov-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/344055
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorGubi, Peter M.en
dc.contributor.authorLivesey, Catherine S. R.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-02T17:35:00Zen
dc.date.available2015-02-02T17:35:00Zen
dc.date.issued2014-11en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/344055en
dc.description.abstractThis research study explores four nurse’s experiences of working in a children’s hospice and uncovers hospice experiences that contribute to personal mortality exploration. The study investigates how these experiences impact the nurses’ thoughts and feelings surrounding their comprehension of their own life and death. The study addresses if a counselling service would be viewed as a beneficial resource in supporting hospice nurses explore their mortality, and where appropriate, also offers recommendations for additional emotional support for nurses. The study is qualitative in nature and uses Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) as its mode of inquiry and analysis. Following interviews, transcription took place before carrying out a detailed analysis of the data. The study revealed that the nurses hold extensive knowledge in their field of work and possess a considerable appreciation of their own mortality. However, there was a clear avoidance for most of the participants in discussing personal mortality in any significant emotional depth. A reoccurring link was discovered between being a children’s hospice nurse and the mortality of the nurses’ own children. This link proved to provoke the most significant emotional response within the nurses. Finally the research found that children’s hospice nurses would find a staff counselling service beneficial to support them in their role. The study concludes that further research into the link between children’s hospice nursing and personal mortality wishes would be helpful in creating a solid body of literature within this field. It is also suggested that research with hospice nurses who have been witness to what they perceive as ‘traumatic’ experiences and whom have engaged in counselling as a result of these traumas may be another area worthy of research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectpersonal mortalityen
dc.subjectInterpreative Phenomenological Analysisen
dc.subjecthospicesen
dc.subjectnursesen
dc.titleA qualitative exploration into the impact that working as a nurse in a children's hospice has on one's thoughts and feelings surrounding personal mortalityen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMAen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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