The role of the Chaplain in the strategic facilitation of multi-faith sacred space to alleviate the suffering associated with death and dying

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/344054
Title:
The role of the Chaplain in the strategic facilitation of multi-faith sacred space to alleviate the suffering associated with death and dying
Authors:
Rusted, Giselle
Abstract:
The aim of the research was to observe and scrutinise how chaplains go about facilitating a sacred space when requested, in the last days and hours of death. It sought to identify the context in which chaplains are compelled to facilitate religious and spiritual rituals and what perspectives participants have of chaplains when creating a sacred space within non-orthodox, clinical spaces. It also sought to understand the added value of chaplaincy in relation to high quatlity patient care and who was best placed to faciliate a sacred space at the point of death and dying. The research used a cross sectional design study with purposive sampling and carried out ten one to one interviews with hospital staff, who had experienced chaplaincy. They were selected from different areas of the hospital. Additionally, the research used the participant observations of the researcher who is a chaplin. Using a thematic annalysis process to identify emerging themes, the research was able to achieve an indepth understanding of the contributions made by chaplains to patient and family experience, at the point of death and dying. The research concluded that death is perceived as a significant rite of passage which requires marking; subject to a variety of expectations and that those best placed to deliver this service are chaplains, perceived as practioners in this field. The research indicated that chaplains care and are compassionate, courageous, competent and committed to providing high quality patient and family experience. Recommending that there should be greater collaboration between clinicians and chaplaincy because chaplains use their experience and knowledge when they are alongside patients and family, normalising death and contribute to a good death.
Advisors:
Baker, Christopher
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Sep-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/344054
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorBaker, Christopheren
dc.contributor.authorRusted, Giselleen
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-02T17:34:27Z-
dc.date.available2015-02-02T17:34:27Z-
dc.date.issued2014-09-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/344054-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the research was to observe and scrutinise how chaplains go about facilitating a sacred space when requested, in the last days and hours of death. It sought to identify the context in which chaplains are compelled to facilitate religious and spiritual rituals and what perspectives participants have of chaplains when creating a sacred space within non-orthodox, clinical spaces. It also sought to understand the added value of chaplaincy in relation to high quatlity patient care and who was best placed to faciliate a sacred space at the point of death and dying. The research used a cross sectional design study with purposive sampling and carried out ten one to one interviews with hospital staff, who had experienced chaplaincy. They were selected from different areas of the hospital. Additionally, the research used the participant observations of the researcher who is a chaplin. Using a thematic annalysis process to identify emerging themes, the research was able to achieve an indepth understanding of the contributions made by chaplains to patient and family experience, at the point of death and dying. The research concluded that death is perceived as a significant rite of passage which requires marking; subject to a variety of expectations and that those best placed to deliver this service are chaplains, perceived as practioners in this field. The research indicated that chaplains care and are compassionate, courageous, competent and committed to providing high quality patient and family experience. Recommending that there should be greater collaboration between clinicians and chaplaincy because chaplains use their experience and knowledge when they are alongside patients and family, normalising death and contribute to a good death.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectchaplainsen
dc.subjectdeathen
dc.titleThe role of the Chaplain in the strategic facilitation of multi-faith sacred space to alleviate the suffering associated with death and dyingen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMAen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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