Victim, perpetrator, and offense characteristics in filicide and filicide-suicide

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/337908
Title:
Victim, perpetrator, and offense characteristics in filicide and filicide-suicide
Authors:
Debowska, Agata; Boduszek, Daniel; Dhingra, Katie
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical review of most recent studies of parental and stepparental filicide. A detailed review of the literature revealed the importance of certain demographic, environmental, and psychosocial factors in the commission of child homicide. Our findings indicate that filicides perpetrated by genetic parents and stepparents differ considerably in terms of underlying motivational factors. Data in the literature suggest that biological parents are more likely to choose methods of killing which produce quick and painless death, whereas stepparents frequently kill their wards by beating. Research results demonstrate the victims of maternal filicides to be significantly younger than the victims of paternal filicides. Additionally, filicide-suicide is most often associated with parental psychopathology. Genetic fathers are at the greatest risk of death by suicide after the commission of familicide. These findings are discussed in relation to theoretical frameworks explaining the occurrence of child murder. Further, limitations of reviewed studies and directions for future research are presented.
Affiliation:
University of Chester ; University of Huddersfield ; Manchester Metropolitan University
Citation:
Aggression and Violent Behavior, 2015, 21, pp. 113-124.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Aggression and Violent Behavior
Publication Date:
7-Jan-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/337908
DOI:
10.1016/j.avb.2015.01.011
Additional Links:
http://www.journals.elsevier.com/aggression-and-violent-behavior/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Aggression and Violent Behavior. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Aggression and Violent Behavior, 2015, 21, pp. 113-124. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2015.01.011
ISSN:
1359-1789
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDebowska, Agataen
dc.contributor.authorBoduszek, Danielen
dc.contributor.authorDhingra, Katieen
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-07T16:14:57Zen
dc.date.available2015-01-07T16:14:57Zen
dc.date.issued2015-01-07en
dc.identifier.citationAggression and Violent Behavior, 2015, 21, pp. 113-124.en
dc.identifier.issn1359-1789en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.avb.2015.01.011en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/337908en
dc.descriptionNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Aggression and Violent Behavior. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Aggression and Violent Behavior, 2015, 21, pp. 113-124. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2015.01.011en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is to provide a critical review of most recent studies of parental and stepparental filicide. A detailed review of the literature revealed the importance of certain demographic, environmental, and psychosocial factors in the commission of child homicide. Our findings indicate that filicides perpetrated by genetic parents and stepparents differ considerably in terms of underlying motivational factors. Data in the literature suggest that biological parents are more likely to choose methods of killing which produce quick and painless death, whereas stepparents frequently kill their wards by beating. Research results demonstrate the victims of maternal filicides to be significantly younger than the victims of paternal filicides. Additionally, filicide-suicide is most often associated with parental psychopathology. Genetic fathers are at the greatest risk of death by suicide after the commission of familicide. These findings are discussed in relation to theoretical frameworks explaining the occurrence of child murder. Further, limitations of reviewed studies and directions for future research are presented.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journals.elsevier.com/aggression-and-violent-behavior/en
dc.subjectmaternal filicideen
dc.subjectpaternal filicideen
dc.subjectstepparental filicideen
dc.subjectfilicide-suicideen
dc.titleVictim, perpetrator, and offense characteristics in filicide and filicide-suicideen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester ; University of Huddersfield ; Manchester Metropolitan Universityen
dc.identifier.journalAggression and Violent Behavioren
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.