English professional football clubs: Can business parameters of small and medium-sized enterprises be applied?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/337474
Title:
English professional football clubs: Can business parameters of small and medium-sized enterprises be applied?
Authors:
Moore, Neil; Levermore, Roger
Abstract:
Purpose ‐ In the last two decades sports studies and sports management journals have called for there to be research in sports management that explores sports links to mainstream management analyses. The purpose of this paper is to argue that in many ways the sports sector is dominated by small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), which have a different dynamic to larger entities and therefore should be analysed accordingly. This paper applies an SME perspective on English professional football clubs. Design/methodology/approach ‐ This paper, drawn from 22 semi-structured interviews with key individuals in the English professional football (soccer) industry, employs an interpretivist approach of semi-structured interviews of key personnel to provide an account of the business practices prevalent in the English football industry. Findings ‐ The findings are as follows: that the sports industry can be regarded as one that is largely constituted of elements that are ascribed with characteristics associated with SMEs called archetypal SMEs, either in entity size, turnover or mentality; that much analysis of the administration and management of the sports industry fails to assess the sector through the prism of SME "modelling"; there are areas of engagement with SME literature that could be useful to the analysis of the management of the sports industry. Originality/value ‐ This paper does what few other papers have achieved by outlining that the sports industry can be effectively examined by applying "SME perspectives" to help explain what might appear to be their idiosyncratic characteristics.
Affiliation:
University of Chester ; University of Liverpool
Citation:
Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal,12, 2(3), pp.196-209
Publisher:
Emerald
Journal:
Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal
Publication Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/337474
DOI:
10.1108/20426781211261511
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/sbm
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This journal article is not available through ChesterRep.
ISSN:
2042-678X
Appears in Collections:
Chester Business School

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Neilen
dc.contributor.authorLevermore, Rogeren
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-22T10:43:04Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-22T10:43:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationSport, Business and Management: An International Journal,12, 2(3), pp.196-209en
dc.identifier.issn2042-678X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/20426781211261511-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/337474-
dc.descriptionThis journal article is not available through ChesterRep.en
dc.description.abstractPurpose ‐ In the last two decades sports studies and sports management journals have called for there to be research in sports management that explores sports links to mainstream management analyses. The purpose of this paper is to argue that in many ways the sports sector is dominated by small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), which have a different dynamic to larger entities and therefore should be analysed accordingly. This paper applies an SME perspective on English professional football clubs. Design/methodology/approach ‐ This paper, drawn from 22 semi-structured interviews with key individuals in the English professional football (soccer) industry, employs an interpretivist approach of semi-structured interviews of key personnel to provide an account of the business practices prevalent in the English football industry. Findings ‐ The findings are as follows: that the sports industry can be regarded as one that is largely constituted of elements that are ascribed with characteristics associated with SMEs called archetypal SMEs, either in entity size, turnover or mentality; that much analysis of the administration and management of the sports industry fails to assess the sector through the prism of SME "modelling"; there are areas of engagement with SME literature that could be useful to the analysis of the management of the sports industry. Originality/value ‐ This paper does what few other papers have achieved by outlining that the sports industry can be effectively examined by applying "SME perspectives" to help explain what might appear to be their idiosyncratic characteristics.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmeralden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/sbmen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sport, Business and Management: An International Journalen
dc.subjectsmall and medium enterprisesen
dc.subjectEnglish football industryen
dc.subjectresource constraintsen
dc.subjectshort‐termismen
dc.subjectwwnershipen
dc.subjectfootballen
dc.titleEnglish professional football clubs: Can business parameters of small and medium-sized enterprises be applied?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester ; University of Liverpoolen
dc.identifier.journalSport, Business and Management: An International Journalen
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