Cordelia's can't: Rhetorics of reticence and (dis)ease in King Lear

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/336316
Title:
Cordelia's can't: Rhetorics of reticence and (dis)ease in King Lear
Authors:
Rees, Emma L. E.
Abstract:
Susan Sontag in "Illness as Metaphor and AIDS and Its Metaphors" points to the vital connection between metaphors and bodily illnesses, and though her analyses deals mainly with modern literary works. This collection of essays examines the vast extent to which rhetorical figures related to sickness and health - metaphor, simile, pun, analogy, symbol, personification, allegory, oxymoron, and metonymy - inform medieval and early modern literature, religion, science, and medicine in England and its surrounding European context. In keeping with the critical trend over the past decade to foreground the matter of the body and the emotions, these essays track the development of sustained, nuanced rhetorics of bodily disease and health-physical, emotional, and spiritual. The contributors to this collection approach their intriguing subjects from a wide range of timely, theoretical, and interdisciplinary perspectives, including the philosophy of language, semiotics, and linguistics; ecology; women's and gender studies; religion; and, the history of medicine. The essays focus on works by Dante, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton among others; the genres of epic, lyric, satire, drama, and the sermon; and cultural history artifacts such as medieval anatomies, the arithmetic of plague bills of mortality, meteorology, and medical guides for healthy regimens.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
In J. C. Vaught (Ed.), Rhetorics of bodily disease and health in medieval and early modern England (pp. 105-116). Farnham, United Kingdom: Ashgate, 2010.
Publisher:
Ashgate
Publication Date:
1-Dec-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/336316
Additional Links:
http://www.ashgate.com
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
This book chapter is not available through ChesterRep
Series/Report no.:
Literary and scientific cultures of early modernity
ISBN:
9780754669487
Sponsors:
This book chapter was submitted to the RAE2014 for the University of Chester - English Language & Literature.
Appears in Collections:
English

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRees, Emma L. E.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-28T11:57:57Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-28T11:57:57Z-
dc.date.issued2010-12-01-
dc.identifier.citationIn J. C. Vaught (Ed.), Rhetorics of bodily disease and health in medieval and early modern England (pp. 105-116). Farnham, United Kingdom: Ashgate, 2010.en
dc.identifier.isbn9780754669487-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/336316-
dc.descriptionThis book chapter is not available through ChesterRepen
dc.description.abstractSusan Sontag in "Illness as Metaphor and AIDS and Its Metaphors" points to the vital connection between metaphors and bodily illnesses, and though her analyses deals mainly with modern literary works. This collection of essays examines the vast extent to which rhetorical figures related to sickness and health - metaphor, simile, pun, analogy, symbol, personification, allegory, oxymoron, and metonymy - inform medieval and early modern literature, religion, science, and medicine in England and its surrounding European context. In keeping with the critical trend over the past decade to foreground the matter of the body and the emotions, these essays track the development of sustained, nuanced rhetorics of bodily disease and health-physical, emotional, and spiritual. The contributors to this collection approach their intriguing subjects from a wide range of timely, theoretical, and interdisciplinary perspectives, including the philosophy of language, semiotics, and linguistics; ecology; women's and gender studies; religion; and, the history of medicine. The essays focus on works by Dante, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton among others; the genres of epic, lyric, satire, drama, and the sermon; and cultural history artifacts such as medieval anatomies, the arithmetic of plague bills of mortality, meteorology, and medical guides for healthy regimens.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis book chapter was submitted to the RAE2014 for the University of Chester - English Language & Literature.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAshgateen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLiterary and scientific cultures of early modernityen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ashgate.comen
dc.subjectKing Learen
dc.subjectCordeliaen
dc.titleCordelia's can't: Rhetorics of reticence and (dis)ease in King Learen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
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