The vagina: A literary and cultural history

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/336309
Title:
The vagina: A literary and cultural history
Authors:
Rees, Emma L. E.
Abstract:
From South Park to Kathy Acker, and from Lars Von Trier to Sex and the City, women’s sexual organs are demonized. Rees traces the fascinating evolution of this demonization, considering how calling the ‘c-word’ obscene both legitimates and perpetuates the fractured identities of women globally. Rees demonstrates how writers, artists, and filmmakers contend with the dilemma of the vagina’s puzzlingly ‘covert visibility’. In our postmodern, porn-obsessed culture, vaginas appear to be everywhere, literally or symbolically but, crucially, they are as silenced as they are objectified. The Vagina: A Literary and Cultural History examines the paradox of female genitalia through five fields of artistic expression: literature, film, TV, visual, and performance art. There is a peculiar paradox – unlike any other – regarding female genitalia. Rees focuses on this paradox of what is termed the ‘covert visibility’ of the vagina and on its monstrous manifestations. That is, what happens when the female body refuses to be pathologized, eroticized, or rendered subordinate to the will or intention of another? Common, and often offensive, slang terms for the vagina can be seen as an attempt to divert attention away from the reality of women’s lived sexual experiences such that we don’t ‘look’ at the vagina itself – slang offers a convenient distraction to something so taboo. The Vagina: A Literary and Cultural History is an important contribution to the ongoing debate in understanding the feminine identity.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
London: Bloomsbury, 2013. Paperback version issued 2015. Also available on kindle
Publisher:
Bloomsbury
Publication Date:
1-Aug-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/336309
Additional Links:
http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/the-vagina-a-literary-and-cultural-history-9781623567897/
Type:
Book
Language:
en
Description:
This book is not available through ChesterRep.
ISSN:
9781628922127
ISBN:
9781623568719
Sponsors:
This book was submitted to the RAE2014 for the University of Chester - English Language & Literature.
Appears in Collections:
English

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRees, Emma L. E.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-28T11:10:11Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-28T11:10:11Z-
dc.date.issued2013-08-01-
dc.identifier.citationLondon: Bloomsbury, 2013. Paperback version issued 2015. Also available on kindleen
dc.identifier.isbn9781623568719-
dc.identifier.issn9781628922127-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/336309-
dc.descriptionThis book is not available through ChesterRep.en
dc.description.abstractFrom South Park to Kathy Acker, and from Lars Von Trier to Sex and the City, women’s sexual organs are demonized. Rees traces the fascinating evolution of this demonization, considering how calling the ‘c-word’ obscene both legitimates and perpetuates the fractured identities of women globally. Rees demonstrates how writers, artists, and filmmakers contend with the dilemma of the vagina’s puzzlingly ‘covert visibility’. In our postmodern, porn-obsessed culture, vaginas appear to be everywhere, literally or symbolically but, crucially, they are as silenced as they are objectified. The Vagina: A Literary and Cultural History examines the paradox of female genitalia through five fields of artistic expression: literature, film, TV, visual, and performance art. There is a peculiar paradox – unlike any other – regarding female genitalia. Rees focuses on this paradox of what is termed the ‘covert visibility’ of the vagina and on its monstrous manifestations. That is, what happens when the female body refuses to be pathologized, eroticized, or rendered subordinate to the will or intention of another? Common, and often offensive, slang terms for the vagina can be seen as an attempt to divert attention away from the reality of women’s lived sexual experiences such that we don’t ‘look’ at the vagina itself – slang offers a convenient distraction to something so taboo. The Vagina: A Literary and Cultural History is an important contribution to the ongoing debate in understanding the feminine identity.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis book was submitted to the RAE2014 for the University of Chester - English Language & Literature.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBloomsburyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/the-vagina-a-literary-and-cultural-history-9781623567897/en
dc.subjectliterary theoryen
dc.subjectliteratureen
dc.subjectgenderen
dc.subjectsexualityen
dc.titleThe vagina: A literary and cultural historyen
dc.typeBooken
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.