The issues affecting mental health nursing in Uganda

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/335979
Title:
The issues affecting mental health nursing in Uganda
Authors:
Bailey, Jan
Abstract:
Estimates are that up to 35% of the Ugandan populations have a mental health condition; however access to psychiatric care, particularly for people living in rural areas, is poor. Additionally, cultural and lay beliefs and stigma affect both the individual with mental illness and healthcare professionals. The Ugandan government has recognized the need to modernize legislation and develop policies designed to provide modern psychiatric services to the whole population. Strategies include, passing new legislation, integrating services into primary care, including psychiatric illness in nurse education. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that this rhetoric is not being fully enacted. This paper reviews the issues affecting the development and delivery of improved mental health services, with a particular focus on psychiatric nursing. Actions that have already successfully addressed issues with psychiatric services in Uganda are highlighted and conclusions drawn regarding the development of future services.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Journal of Psychiatry, 2014, 17(6)
Publisher:
OMICS Group International
Journal:
Journal of Psychiatry
Publication Date:
30-Sep-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/335979
DOI:
10.4172/1994-8220.1000158
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
ISSN:
1994-8220
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Janen
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-21T16:30:49Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-21T16:30:49Z-
dc.date.issued2014-09-30-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Psychiatry, 2014, 17(6)en
dc.identifier.issn1994-8220-
dc.identifier.doi10.4172/1994-8220.1000158-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/335979-
dc.descriptionThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.description.abstractEstimates are that up to 35% of the Ugandan populations have a mental health condition; however access to psychiatric care, particularly for people living in rural areas, is poor. Additionally, cultural and lay beliefs and stigma affect both the individual with mental illness and healthcare professionals. The Ugandan government has recognized the need to modernize legislation and develop policies designed to provide modern psychiatric services to the whole population. Strategies include, passing new legislation, integrating services into primary care, including psychiatric illness in nurse education. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that this rhetoric is not being fully enacted. This paper reviews the issues affecting the development and delivery of improved mental health services, with a particular focus on psychiatric nursing. Actions that have already successfully addressed issues with psychiatric services in Uganda are highlighted and conclusions drawn regarding the development of future services.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOMICS Group Internationalen
dc.subjectmental health nursingen
dc.subjectUgandaen
dc.subjectmental healthen
dc.titleThe issues affecting mental health nursing in Ugandaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Psychiatryen
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