Early Christian voluntary martyrdom: A statement for the defence

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/333492
Title:
Early Christian voluntary martyrdom: A statement for the defence
Authors:
Middleton, Paul
Abstract:
Many studies of early Christian martyrdom have noted the phenomenon of voluntary martyrdom. However, most scholars, drawing on criticism of the practice found in the Martyrdom of Polycarp and Clement of Alexandria, dismiss those who provoked their own arrest and death as deviant, heretical, or numerically insignificant. This article argues instead that the earliest Christian martyrologies celebrate voluntary martyrdom as a valid mainstream Christian practice, which faced only isolated challenge in the first three centuries. Furthermore, pagan sources support the view that voluntary martyrdom was a significant historical as well as literary phenomenon. As there is no reason to conclude voluntary martyrdom was anything other than a valid subset of proto-orthodox Christian martyrdom, more attention should be paid to this phenomenon by early Christian historians.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Journal of Theological Studies, 2013, 64(2), pp. 556-573
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
Journal of Theological Studies
Publication Date:
Oct-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/333492
DOI:
10.1093/jts/flt123
Additional Links:
http://jts.oxfordjournals.org/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Theological Studies following peer review. The version of record, 2013, 64(2), 556-573 is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jts/flt123
ISSN:
0022-5185
EISSN:
1477-4607
Sponsors:
This article was submitted to the RAE2014 for the University of Chester - Theology & Religious Studies.
Appears in Collections:
Theology and Religious Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMiddleton, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-31T14:11:13Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-31T14:11:13Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Theological Studies, 2013, 64(2), pp. 556-573en
dc.identifier.issn0022-5185-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jts/flt123-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/333492-
dc.descriptionThis is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Theological Studies following peer review. The version of record, 2013, 64(2), 556-573 is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jts/flt123en
dc.description.abstractMany studies of early Christian martyrdom have noted the phenomenon of voluntary martyrdom. However, most scholars, drawing on criticism of the practice found in the Martyrdom of Polycarp and Clement of Alexandria, dismiss those who provoked their own arrest and death as deviant, heretical, or numerically insignificant. This article argues instead that the earliest Christian martyrologies celebrate voluntary martyrdom as a valid mainstream Christian practice, which faced only isolated challenge in the first three centuries. Furthermore, pagan sources support the view that voluntary martyrdom was a significant historical as well as literary phenomenon. As there is no reason to conclude voluntary martyrdom was anything other than a valid subset of proto-orthodox Christian martyrdom, more attention should be paid to this phenomenon by early Christian historians.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis article was submitted to the RAE2014 for the University of Chester - Theology & Religious Studies.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jts.oxfordjournals.org/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of Theological Studiesen
dc.subjectmartyrdomen
dc.subjectearly Christianityen
dc.titleEarly Christian voluntary martyrdom: A statement for the defenceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1477-4607-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Theological Studiesen
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