The role obligations of learners and lecturers in higher education

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/326190
Title:
The role obligations of learners and lecturers in higher education
Authors:
Regan, Julie-Anne
Abstract:
The current discussion of consumerism in higher education focuses largely on what the providers are obliged to do for the consumers, fuelled by the rising tuition fees. This framework does not always sit comfortably with lecturers in the context of a learning and teaching relationship, as it appears to ignore the reciprocal obligations lecturers and learners have to one another. The purpose of this paper is to offer an alternative view of what lecturers and learners are obliged to do in the learning and teaching relationship, if learning is to be effective. The claims made in this paper are as follows: in higher education, both learners and lecturers have moral role obligations; these moral role obligations are derived from the functions of the roles being voluntarily undertaken by each party; therefore, by ascertaining the functions of a learner and of a lecturer, both a descriptive purpose and a normative purpose will be revealed for each; using moral role obligations as a basis for the student/lecturer relationship offers a less contentious alternative to the consumerist model. This paper demonstrates, using Aristotle’s function argument, that defining the function of an entity (in this case a role), has both a descriptive and normative purpose. It then briefly outlines possible definitions for the roles of learner and lecturer in higher education. Having made a claim (albeit a tentative one) to define the functions of learner and lecturer, recommendations are made on how these role obligations can be utilised to create an effective learning relationship.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Journal of Philosophy of Education, 2012, 46(1), pp. 14-28
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Journal of Philosophy of Education
Publication Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/326190
DOI:
10.1111/j.1467-9752.2011.00834.x
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-9752
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Journal of Philosophy of Education, 2012, 46(1), pp. 14-28, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9752.2011.00834.x. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.
ISSN:
0309-8249
EISSN:
1467-9752
Appears in Collections:
Learning and Teaching Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRegan, Julie-Anneen
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-17T10:12:49Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-17T10:12:49Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Philosophy of Education, 2012, 46(1), pp. 14-28en
dc.identifier.issn0309-8249-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-9752.2011.00834.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/326190-
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Journal of Philosophy of Education, 2012, 46(1), pp. 14-28, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9752.2011.00834.x. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.en
dc.description.abstractThe current discussion of consumerism in higher education focuses largely on what the providers are obliged to do for the consumers, fuelled by the rising tuition fees. This framework does not always sit comfortably with lecturers in the context of a learning and teaching relationship, as it appears to ignore the reciprocal obligations lecturers and learners have to one another. The purpose of this paper is to offer an alternative view of what lecturers and learners are obliged to do in the learning and teaching relationship, if learning is to be effective. The claims made in this paper are as follows: in higher education, both learners and lecturers have moral role obligations; these moral role obligations are derived from the functions of the roles being voluntarily undertaken by each party; therefore, by ascertaining the functions of a learner and of a lecturer, both a descriptive purpose and a normative purpose will be revealed for each; using moral role obligations as a basis for the student/lecturer relationship offers a less contentious alternative to the consumerist model. This paper demonstrates, using Aristotle’s function argument, that defining the function of an entity (in this case a role), has both a descriptive and normative purpose. It then briefly outlines possible definitions for the roles of learner and lecturer in higher education. Having made a claim (albeit a tentative one) to define the functions of learner and lecturer, recommendations are made on how these role obligations can be utilised to create an effective learning relationship.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-9752en
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rights.uriAn error occurred getting the license - uri.*
dc.subjectrole obligationsen
dc.subjecthigher educationen
dc.subjectstudentsen
dc.subjectlecturersen
dc.titleThe role obligations of learners and lecturers in higher educationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1467-9752-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Philosophy of Educationen
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