A qualitative study to explore factors that influence the vocabulary used by Cancer Nurse Specialists in a District General Hospital

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/325961
Title:
A qualitative study to explore factors that influence the vocabulary used by Cancer Nurse Specialists in a District General Hospital
Authors:
Boothman, Helen C.
Abstract:
There are 1.6 million people living with a diagnosis of cancer. A plethora of reports and studies have demonstrated that effective communication between health professionals and patients forms the foundation for caring for people with cancer. Effective communication has been shown to reduce levels of depression and anxiety, improve levels of self-esteem and well-being, reduce psychological morbidity and increase survival. Despite this there are ongoing concerns regarding the language used by health professions and the impacts on people with cancer. The literature search reveals there is research available concerning the language used by professionals and the effect upon people with cancer however there does not appear to be any research on factors that have influenced the vocabulary and language used. The sample population consists of 14 CNS’s across a range of cancer specialities. All 14 CNS’s were invited to participate; the eight respondents form the study sample. The setting is a DGH in the North West of England. Qualitative data was collected via digitally recorded semi-structured interviews using an interview guide. The recordings were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the framework of Cohen, Kahn and Steeves. Four broad themes representing four key factors that influence CNS’s vocabulary emerged; people with cancer, personal, process and publicity. Each of the four themes encompasses sub themes. ‘People with cancer’ includes the vocabulary of people with cancer, non-verbal language, narrative and the influence of relatives. The ‘personal experience’ of the CNS includes level of experience in the role, knowledge of speciality, confidence, personal experience of cancer, reflection and listening and learning. The third theme ‘process’ includes themes concerning consultants, stage of the patient journey, training courses, cancer type, environment, terminology, policy and team working. The fourth theme ‘publicity’ includes the influence media awareness, the internet and literature. The study reveals multiple factors influence the vocabulary CNS’s in a DGH use when communicating with people with cancer. The study provides new insight into how CNS’s form and choose their vocabulary in response to the stimuli and influences of the people they care for and work with. The findings reveal new data on the interaction and interconnectedness of the experience, knowledge and confidence of the CNS and how these factors influence vocabulary and communications with people with cancer.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Mar-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/325961
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBoothman, Helen C.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-09T09:48:35Zen
dc.date.available2014-09-09T09:48:35Zen
dc.date.issued2014-03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/325961en
dc.description.abstractThere are 1.6 million people living with a diagnosis of cancer. A plethora of reports and studies have demonstrated that effective communication between health professionals and patients forms the foundation for caring for people with cancer. Effective communication has been shown to reduce levels of depression and anxiety, improve levels of self-esteem and well-being, reduce psychological morbidity and increase survival. Despite this there are ongoing concerns regarding the language used by health professions and the impacts on people with cancer. The literature search reveals there is research available concerning the language used by professionals and the effect upon people with cancer however there does not appear to be any research on factors that have influenced the vocabulary and language used. The sample population consists of 14 CNS’s across a range of cancer specialities. All 14 CNS’s were invited to participate; the eight respondents form the study sample. The setting is a DGH in the North West of England. Qualitative data was collected via digitally recorded semi-structured interviews using an interview guide. The recordings were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the framework of Cohen, Kahn and Steeves. Four broad themes representing four key factors that influence CNS’s vocabulary emerged; people with cancer, personal, process and publicity. Each of the four themes encompasses sub themes. ‘People with cancer’ includes the vocabulary of people with cancer, non-verbal language, narrative and the influence of relatives. The ‘personal experience’ of the CNS includes level of experience in the role, knowledge of speciality, confidence, personal experience of cancer, reflection and listening and learning. The third theme ‘process’ includes themes concerning consultants, stage of the patient journey, training courses, cancer type, environment, terminology, policy and team working. The fourth theme ‘publicity’ includes the influence media awareness, the internet and literature. The study reveals multiple factors influence the vocabulary CNS’s in a DGH use when communicating with people with cancer. The study provides new insight into how CNS’s form and choose their vocabulary in response to the stimuli and influences of the people they care for and work with. The findings reveal new data on the interaction and interconnectedness of the experience, knowledge and confidence of the CNS and how these factors influence vocabulary and communications with people with cancer.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectClinical Nurse Specialistsen
dc.subjectcancer careen
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.subjectpatientsen
dc.titleA qualitative study to explore factors that influence the vocabulary used by Cancer Nurse Specialists in a District General Hospitalen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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