The effects of exercise-induced muscle damage on pacing strategy during time-trial performance

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/320808
Title:
The effects of exercise-induced muscle damage on pacing strategy during time-trial performance
Authors:
Bott, Richard
Abstract:
Previous research has suggested that resistance training can improve endurance performance by improving muscle strength, power and speed whilst maintaining endurance capacity. However, a consequence of unaccustomed resistance training is the prolonged appearance of exercise induced muscle damage. This study examined the effects of a single bout of resistance exercise designed to elicit muscle damage on cycling performance when pacing in the first 60 seconds of a 5-minute time-trial, which was either controlled by the experimenter or self-paced by the individual. Seventeen cyclists/triathletes were randomly assigned to either a paced group (n= 8) or a self-paced group (n=9). Measurements of perceived muscle soreness, peak isokinetic strength and Creatine kinase were recorded as markers of muscle damage taken before and 48 h after muscle damage protocol. Measurements of , heart rate, rate of perceived exertion and power output were recorded throughout the 5-minute time-trial, conducted before and 48 h after muscle damage. Total distance covered, peak isokinetic torque, blood lactate were reduced for both groups as well as no significant differences were seen between the groups for , heart rate, RPE and power output, during time-trial, 48 h after muscle damage protocol (P>0.05). A trend is seen whereby participants in the paced group are able to match the performance during the first minute as that of their baseline measurement. Participants in the paced group then continue to cycle with a lower decrement in power output compared to those in the self- paced group. It could be speculated that a reduced central drive is the mechanism for a downward regulation of power output seen in the self-paced group and not peripheral factors affecting performance as the paced group are able to maintain a similar peak power output following muscle damage protocol to baseline values.
Advisors:
Twist, Craig
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Sep-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/320808
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorTwist, Craigen
dc.contributor.authorBott, Richarden
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-11T10:59:50Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-11T10:59:50Z-
dc.date.issued2013-09-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/320808-
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has suggested that resistance training can improve endurance performance by improving muscle strength, power and speed whilst maintaining endurance capacity. However, a consequence of unaccustomed resistance training is the prolonged appearance of exercise induced muscle damage. This study examined the effects of a single bout of resistance exercise designed to elicit muscle damage on cycling performance when pacing in the first 60 seconds of a 5-minute time-trial, which was either controlled by the experimenter or self-paced by the individual. Seventeen cyclists/triathletes were randomly assigned to either a paced group (n= 8) or a self-paced group (n=9). Measurements of perceived muscle soreness, peak isokinetic strength and Creatine kinase were recorded as markers of muscle damage taken before and 48 h after muscle damage protocol. Measurements of , heart rate, rate of perceived exertion and power output were recorded throughout the 5-minute time-trial, conducted before and 48 h after muscle damage. Total distance covered, peak isokinetic torque, blood lactate were reduced for both groups as well as no significant differences were seen between the groups for , heart rate, RPE and power output, during time-trial, 48 h after muscle damage protocol (P>0.05). A trend is seen whereby participants in the paced group are able to match the performance during the first minute as that of their baseline measurement. Participants in the paced group then continue to cycle with a lower decrement in power output compared to those in the self- paced group. It could be speculated that a reduced central drive is the mechanism for a downward regulation of power output seen in the self-paced group and not peripheral factors affecting performance as the paced group are able to maintain a similar peak power output following muscle damage protocol to baseline values.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectresistance trainingen
dc.subjectinduced muscle damageen
dc.titleThe effects of exercise-induced muscle damage on pacing strategy during time-trial performanceen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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