The unquiet frontier: the boundaries of philosophy and public theology

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/316656
Title:
The unquiet frontier: the boundaries of philosophy and public theology
Authors:
Graham, Elaine L.
Abstract:
Taking Charles Taylor's characterisation of the boundary between 'a secular age' and the new visibility of religion as 'an unquiet frontier', this paper considers further some of the implications of what it means to occupy the liminal space between the Scylla of secularisation and the Charibdis of religious resurgence, often known as the 'post-secular'. Some advocates of the return of religion focus on its philosophical manifestations, whereas a concentration on religious practices offers, potentially, more traction on the benefits and problems of reconceiving the role of religion in the public square.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Unpublished keynote paper given at the AHRC Research Network on Philosophy and Religious Practices at the Riverside Innovation Centre at the University of Chester, 9 April 2014
Publication Date:
9-Apr-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/316656
Additional Links:
http://www.chester.ac.uk/node/16839
Type:
Working Paper
Language:
en
Sponsors:
Arts and Humanities Research Council
Appears in Collections:
Theology and Religious Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Elaine L.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-09T09:38:57Zen
dc.date.available2014-05-09T09:38:57Zen
dc.date.issued2014-04-09en
dc.identifier.citationUnpublished keynote paper given at the AHRC Research Network on Philosophy and Religious Practices at the Riverside Innovation Centre at the University of Chester, 9 April 2014en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/316656en
dc.description.abstractTaking Charles Taylor's characterisation of the boundary between 'a secular age' and the new visibility of religion as 'an unquiet frontier', this paper considers further some of the implications of what it means to occupy the liminal space between the Scylla of secularisation and the Charibdis of religious resurgence, often known as the 'post-secular'. Some advocates of the return of religion focus on its philosophical manifestations, whereas a concentration on religious practices offers, potentially, more traction on the benefits and problems of reconceiving the role of religion in the public square.en
dc.description.sponsorshipArts and Humanities Research Councilen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.chester.ac.uk/node/16839en
dc.subjectpublic theologyen
dc.subjectphilosophyen
dc.subjectpost-secularen
dc.titleThe unquiet frontier: the boundaries of philosophy and public theologyen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
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