The social influences on the development of the self

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/314146
Title:
The social influences on the development of the self
Authors:
Robinson, Joanne
Abstract:
Self-awareness is defined as one’s ability to differentiate themselves from others, and is influenced by early life experiences (Fonagy, Gergely, & Jurist, 2003). Some children develop self-awareness earlier than others (e.g., Amsterdam, 1972; Lewis & Ramsey, 2004), however, the developmental field has largely neglected to consider how parents may influence the attainment of self-awareness. The present study aimed to explore how typical mother-child interactions might influence infant self-awareness and whether there was a link between object awareness and body self-awareness. In addition, it was predicted that there would be an association between infant mirror-recognition and body self-awareness as found in previous research (Moore, Mealiea, Garon, & Povinelli, 2007). Infants aged between 15-18 months (N=12) were recruited to test their body self-awareness and self-recognition by use of a toy shopping trolley task and mirror-recognition test respectively. The original hypothesis was not supported; there was no association found between infant mirror-recognition and body self-awareness. Additionally, the observed mother-child interactions did not influence infant self-awareness and there were no links found between object awareness and body self-awareness. The limitations of the study included the small sample size and the lack of longitudinal data. Implications for future research include a larger number of participants, together with collecting longitudinal and cross-cultural data to examine any cultural differences in infant self-awareness.
Advisors:
Yilmaz, Mandy
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/314146
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorYilmaz, Mandyen
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Joanneen
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-17T09:08:44Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-17T09:08:44Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/314146-
dc.description.abstractSelf-awareness is defined as one’s ability to differentiate themselves from others, and is influenced by early life experiences (Fonagy, Gergely, & Jurist, 2003). Some children develop self-awareness earlier than others (e.g., Amsterdam, 1972; Lewis & Ramsey, 2004), however, the developmental field has largely neglected to consider how parents may influence the attainment of self-awareness. The present study aimed to explore how typical mother-child interactions might influence infant self-awareness and whether there was a link between object awareness and body self-awareness. In addition, it was predicted that there would be an association between infant mirror-recognition and body self-awareness as found in previous research (Moore, Mealiea, Garon, & Povinelli, 2007). Infants aged between 15-18 months (N=12) were recruited to test their body self-awareness and self-recognition by use of a toy shopping trolley task and mirror-recognition test respectively. The original hypothesis was not supported; there was no association found between infant mirror-recognition and body self-awareness. Additionally, the observed mother-child interactions did not influence infant self-awareness and there were no links found between object awareness and body self-awareness. The limitations of the study included the small sample size and the lack of longitudinal data. Implications for future research include a larger number of participants, together with collecting longitudinal and cross-cultural data to examine any cultural differences in infant self-awareness.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectinfanten
dc.subjectself-recognitionen
dc.subjectbody self-awarenessen
dc.subjectmother-child interactionsen
dc.subjectcultureen
dc.titleThe social influences on the development of the selfen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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