Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/283214
Title:
Underlying cause discovered for a prior idiopathic AMI
Authors:
Godfrey, Richard; O’Hanlon, Rory; Wilson, Mathew G.; Buckley, John P.; Sharma, Sanjay; Whyte, Greg
Abstract:
The authors previously reported on an active, young male with normal coronaries who sustained an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The acute cause was a coronary thrombus; however, the cause of this thrombus and a definitive diagnosis remained elusive for 18 months until a new series of events, including symptoms of breathlessness, dizziness and collapse led to acute hospital admission. CT scan revealed numerous deep venous thromboses in the right leg and bilateral pulmonary emboli (PE). Acute pharmacological thrombolysis eliminated breathlessness and significantly reduced the risk of mortality. Clinical consensus suggests a coagulopathy, requiring indefinite treatment with Warfarin. In young individuals presenting with AMI, lifestyle, personal, family and clinical history should be considered and coronary artery disease should not be assumed until further tests have eliminated coagulopathy. In those presenting with breathlessness and a history which includes AMI, a CT scan is indicated to eliminate concerns of venous thromboembolism generally and PE specifically where untreated survival times are short.
Affiliation:
Brunel University ; St Vincent’s University Hospital, Ireland ; Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital ; Kings College Hospital, London ; Liverpool John Moores University
Citation:
British Medical Journal Case Reports, 30 March 2011, online
Journal:
British Medical Journal Case Reports
Publication Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/283214
DOI:
10.1136/bcr.02.2011.3799
Additional Links:
http://casereports.bmj.com/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article is not available through ChesterRep.
ISSN:
1757-790X
Appears in Collections:
Clinical Sciences and Nutrition

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGodfrey, Richarden_GB
dc.contributor.authorO’Hanlon, Roryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Mathew G.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, John P.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSharma, Sanjayen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhyte, Gregen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-19T12:58:52Zen
dc.date.available2013-04-19T12:58:52Zen
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.citationBritish Medical Journal Case Reports, 30 March 2011, onlineen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1757-790Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bcr.02.2011.3799en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/283214en
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThe authors previously reported on an active, young male with normal coronaries who sustained an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The acute cause was a coronary thrombus; however, the cause of this thrombus and a definitive diagnosis remained elusive for 18 months until a new series of events, including symptoms of breathlessness, dizziness and collapse led to acute hospital admission. CT scan revealed numerous deep venous thromboses in the right leg and bilateral pulmonary emboli (PE). Acute pharmacological thrombolysis eliminated breathlessness and significantly reduced the risk of mortality. Clinical consensus suggests a coagulopathy, requiring indefinite treatment with Warfarin. In young individuals presenting with AMI, lifestyle, personal, family and clinical history should be considered and coronary artery disease should not be assumed until further tests have eliminated coagulopathy. In those presenting with breathlessness and a history which includes AMI, a CT scan is indicated to eliminate concerns of venous thromboembolism generally and PE specifically where untreated survival times are short.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://casereports.bmj.com/en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Case Reportsen_GB
dc.subjectacute myocardial infarctionen_GB
dc.titleUnderlying cause discovered for a prior idiopathic AMIen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBrunel University ; St Vincent’s University Hospital, Ireland ; Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital ; Kings College Hospital, London ; Liverpool John Moores Universityen_GB
dc.identifier.journalBritish Medical Journal Case Reportsen_GB
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