Why is cardiac rehabilitation so important? Taking the traditional components of cardiac rehabilitation and making them fit contemporary service and patient needs

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/281704
Title:
Why is cardiac rehabilitation so important? Taking the traditional components of cardiac rehabilitation and making them fit contemporary service and patient needs
Authors:
Buckley, John P.
Abstract:
Current statistics, available from outcomes following the National Service Framework (NSF) on Coronary Heart Disease,1 show that more people are surviving longer both after an acute coronary event and after a symptom-led diagnosis of coronary artery disease. In the past, cardiac rehabilitation (CR) played a key role in preventing premature mortality2 but more recently the greatly enhanced emergency services, better public education and more aggressive and widely available medical interventions may have diminished the effect of CR on premature mortality. There is now an increasing focus on productivity of life in those surviving acute myocardial events. Productivity refers to people’s active involvement in the local social and economic fabric of their families, friends and community. Some of these matters are less likely to be a function of technical medical care but rather a function of healthcare professionals providing therapeutic and health-promoting support for people to manage the physical, mental, domestic, occupational and social aspects of their lives – all of the goals at the heart of a good CR and chronic disease management and prevention programme.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
British Journal of Cardiology, 2011, 18 (Supp 1), S3–S4
Journal:
British Journal of Cardiology
Publication Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/281704
Additional Links:
http://bjcardio.co.uk/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article is not available through ChesterRep.
ISSN:
0969-6113
Appears in Collections:
Clinical Sciences and Nutrition

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, John P.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-17T15:32:51Zen
dc.date.available2013-04-17T15:32:51Zen
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Cardiology, 2011, 18 (Supp 1), S3–S4en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0969-6113en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/281704en
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en_GB
dc.description.abstractCurrent statistics, available from outcomes following the National Service Framework (NSF) on Coronary Heart Disease,1 show that more people are surviving longer both after an acute coronary event and after a symptom-led diagnosis of coronary artery disease. In the past, cardiac rehabilitation (CR) played a key role in preventing premature mortality2 but more recently the greatly enhanced emergency services, better public education and more aggressive and widely available medical interventions may have diminished the effect of CR on premature mortality. There is now an increasing focus on productivity of life in those surviving acute myocardial events. Productivity refers to people’s active involvement in the local social and economic fabric of their families, friends and community. Some of these matters are less likely to be a function of technical medical care but rather a function of healthcare professionals providing therapeutic and health-promoting support for people to manage the physical, mental, domestic, occupational and social aspects of their lives – all of the goals at the heart of a good CR and chronic disease management and prevention programme.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bjcardio.co.uk/en_GB
dc.subjectcardiac rehabilitation servicesen_GB
dc.titleWhy is cardiac rehabilitation so important? Taking the traditional components of cardiac rehabilitation and making them fit contemporary service and patient needsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren_GB
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Cardiologyen_GB
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