'They died for Germany': Jewish soldiers, the German Army and conservative debates about the Nazi past in the 1960s

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/279475
Title:
'They died for Germany': Jewish soldiers, the German Army and conservative debates about the Nazi past in the 1960s
Authors:
Grady, Tim
Abstract:
There has been an increasing recognition in recent historical writing that the late 1950s and early 1960s marked a significant shift in West German society's relationship to the Nazi past. Yet the older more conservative generation that dominated West Germany's politics of confronting the past in the immediate post-war years are largely absent from these narratives. Focusing on the actions of the Federal Republic's staunchly conservative Defence Minister, Franz Josef Strauß, this article argues that even the conservative establishment played a significant role in West Germany's evolving memory culture. In the early 1960s, Strauß promoted the republication of a book of German-Jewish soldiers' war letters from the First World War. The collection enabled him to portray a different side of West Germany at a time when attention had focused back onto the crimes of the Nazi era. Despite this opportunism, the article contends that Strauß's support for the new book encouraged other conservative institutions to engage more fully with the recent past.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
European History Quarterly, 2009, 39(1), pp. 27-46
Publisher:
SAGE
Journal:
European History Quarterly
Publication Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/279475
DOI:
10.1177/0265691408097365
Additional Links:
http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal200846
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article is not available through ChesterRep.
ISSN:
0265-6914
Appears in Collections:
History and Archaeology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGrady, Timen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-09T09:06:03Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-09T09:06:03Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean History Quarterly, 2009, 39(1), pp. 27-46en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0265-6914-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0265691408097365-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/279475-
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThere has been an increasing recognition in recent historical writing that the late 1950s and early 1960s marked a significant shift in West German society's relationship to the Nazi past. Yet the older more conservative generation that dominated West Germany's politics of confronting the past in the immediate post-war years are largely absent from these narratives. Focusing on the actions of the Federal Republic's staunchly conservative Defence Minister, Franz Josef Strauß, this article argues that even the conservative establishment played a significant role in West Germany's evolving memory culture. In the early 1960s, Strauß promoted the republication of a book of German-Jewish soldiers' war letters from the First World War. The collection enabled him to portray a different side of West Germany at a time when attention had focused back onto the crimes of the Nazi era. Despite this opportunism, the article contends that Strauß's support for the new book encouraged other conservative institutions to engage more fully with the recent past.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGEen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal200846en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European History Quarterlyen_GB
dc.subjectWorld War Ien_GB
dc.subjectFranz Josef Straußen_GB
dc.subjectGerman Jewsen_GB
dc.title'They died for Germany': Jewish soldiers, the German Army and conservative debates about the Nazi past in the 1960sen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean History Quarterlyen_GB
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