Pupils’ perceptions of bullying and disruptions to concentration and attention to school work

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/279474
Title:
Pupils’ perceptions of bullying and disruptions to concentration and attention to school work
Authors:
Boulton, Michael J.
Abstract:
This article discusses how disrupted concentration and attention to school work due to bullying can impact on academic success. Using pupil perceptions as the source of data, the two main aims were to quantify the proportion of pupils affected by bullying in this way, and to solicit their views on possible solutions. Subsidiary aims were to test for gender and school year differences in these variables. Among the 485 participants as a whole, only modest levels of disruptions attributable to bullying were evident but more disturbing was the finding that on nine out of eleven separate questions, around one in twenty pupils reported that this happened ‘lots of times’.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Pastoral Care in Education, 2008, 26(2), pp. 83-89
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Pastoral Care in Education
Publication Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/279474
DOI:
10.1080/02643940802062592
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1468-0122
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article is not available through ChesterRep.
ISSN:
0264-3944; 1468-0122
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBoulton, Michael J.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-09T08:35:12Zen
dc.date.available2013-04-09T08:35:12Zen
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.citationPastoral Care in Education, 2008, 26(2), pp. 83-89en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0264-3944en
dc.identifier.issn1468-0122en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02643940802062592en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/279474en
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThis article discusses how disrupted concentration and attention to school work due to bullying can impact on academic success. Using pupil perceptions as the source of data, the two main aims were to quantify the proportion of pupils affected by bullying in this way, and to solicit their views on possible solutions. Subsidiary aims were to test for gender and school year differences in these variables. Among the 485 participants as a whole, only modest levels of disruptions attributable to bullying were evident but more disturbing was the finding that on nine out of eleven separate questions, around one in twenty pupils reported that this happened ‘lots of times’.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1468-0122en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Pastoral Care in Educationen_GB
dc.subjectbullyingen_GB
dc.subjectacademic successen_GB
dc.titlePupils’ perceptions of bullying and disruptions to concentration and attention to school worken
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren_GB
dc.identifier.journalPastoral Care in Educationen_GB
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