Impact of hand-held weights on treadmill walking in previously sedentary women

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/279072
Title:
Impact of hand-held weights on treadmill walking in previously sedentary women
Authors:
Savin, Deborah J.
Abstract:
The aim of this dissertation was to study the physiological adaptations when hand-held weights are incorporated into a six-week programme of regular walking. Fourteen sendentary women aged 37+/-8 years were randomly allocated into one of two groups; hand-held weight group (HWG) and control group (CG). Twelve women (six per group) completed the study. Both groups completed a six-week unsupervised exercise programme comprising three 30min treadmill walks per week at 60-75% of predicted maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). HWG carried two 0.91kg (2lb) hand-held weights using an active arm swing, CG exercised without weights. All walks were undetaken at 0% incline. Participant progress was monitored via the study website (www.sleepy8.com). Predicted VO2max, distance walked in 10min, body mass, waist circumference and sum of four skinfold sites were measured at Baseline, Week 4 and Week 6. The 12 participants completed 100% of the programme walks. Both groups experienced an increase in predicated VO2max; 37.0+/-4.7ml/kg/min to 40.0+/-4.7ml/kg/min (8%) for HWG, 33.4+/-6.4ml/kg/min to 38.9+/-2.8ml/kg/min (16%) for CG. These increases were neither statistically significant nor significantly different from one another. No significant differences between or within groups were found for body mass, waist circumference or sum of four skinfold sites. The addition of 0.91kg hand-held weights to a six-week regular walking programmes when undertaken by previously sedentary women, does not have a significantly greater impact on aerobic fitness or body composition than unweighted walking. Both forms of exercise were shown to produce meaningful improvements in aerobic fitness, but it is likely that the small sample size prevented these results from registering as statistically significant. There is no evidence to support the introduction of hand-held weights at the beginning of a walking programme for previously sedentary women if the objective is one of acelerating the improvement in aerobic fitness or body compostition. Conversely, no negative consequences of doing so have been observed here.
Advisors:
Morris, Mike
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
31-Jul-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/279072
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMorris, Mikeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSavin, Deborah J.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-05T08:27:08Zen
dc.date.available2013-04-05T08:27:08Zen
dc.date.issued2012-07-31en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/279072en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this dissertation was to study the physiological adaptations when hand-held weights are incorporated into a six-week programme of regular walking. Fourteen sendentary women aged 37+/-8 years were randomly allocated into one of two groups; hand-held weight group (HWG) and control group (CG). Twelve women (six per group) completed the study. Both groups completed a six-week unsupervised exercise programme comprising three 30min treadmill walks per week at 60-75% of predicted maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). HWG carried two 0.91kg (2lb) hand-held weights using an active arm swing, CG exercised without weights. All walks were undetaken at 0% incline. Participant progress was monitored via the study website (www.sleepy8.com). Predicted VO2max, distance walked in 10min, body mass, waist circumference and sum of four skinfold sites were measured at Baseline, Week 4 and Week 6. The 12 participants completed 100% of the programme walks. Both groups experienced an increase in predicated VO2max; 37.0+/-4.7ml/kg/min to 40.0+/-4.7ml/kg/min (8%) for HWG, 33.4+/-6.4ml/kg/min to 38.9+/-2.8ml/kg/min (16%) for CG. These increases were neither statistically significant nor significantly different from one another. No significant differences between or within groups were found for body mass, waist circumference or sum of four skinfold sites. The addition of 0.91kg hand-held weights to a six-week regular walking programmes when undertaken by previously sedentary women, does not have a significantly greater impact on aerobic fitness or body composition than unweighted walking. Both forms of exercise were shown to produce meaningful improvements in aerobic fitness, but it is likely that the small sample size prevented these results from registering as statistically significant. There is no evidence to support the introduction of hand-held weights at the beginning of a walking programme for previously sedentary women if the objective is one of acelerating the improvement in aerobic fitness or body compostition. Conversely, no negative consequences of doing so have been observed here.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjecthand-heldweightsen_GB
dc.subjectwalkingen_GB
dc.subjectwomenen_GB
dc.subjectfitnessen_GB
dc.titleImpact of hand-held weights on treadmill walking in previously sedentary womenen_GB
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.