Coronary heart disease (CHD) knowledge and self-reported health of female students attending a Scottish college

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/211351
Title:
Coronary heart disease (CHD) knowledge and self-reported health of female students attending a Scottish college
Authors:
Lyle, Jacqueline
Abstract:
Purpose: To evaluate the levels of CHD knowledge and self-reported health behaviours in first year female HSC students attending South Lanarkshire College in Scotland. Identify if a relationship exists between the students levels of CHD knowledge and their self-reported health behaviours and identify if a significant difference exists in the CHD knowledge and health behaviours of students who have undertaken a CHD knowledge module as part of their course of study compared to students who have not undertaken the CHD knowledge module as part of their course of study. As it has been suggested that knowledge may be a pre-requisite to positive health behaviour change, which is a key component in the prevention of CHD. Methods: First year Health and Social Care Further Education College Students at a Scottish College were asked to complete a modified CHD knowledge and self-reported health behaviour questionnaire. One-point was awarded for each CHD knowledge question answered correctly, these points were then totaled and students were given a coronary heart disease knowledge score out of a possible score of 52. One-point was also awarded for each positive health behaviour reported, which were then totaled and students were given a health behaviour score out of a possible score of 10. These scores were then used for comparison between the students. Results: One-hundred and eight students took part in the study. Students who received the CHD knowledge module had significantly greater CHD knowledge scores than the students who did not receive the CHD knowledge module (p=0.0001). However, there was no significant difference between the health behaviour scores of students who had received the CHD knowledge module and students who had not received the CHD knowledge module (p=0.742). No relationship was found between the CHD knowledge scores and health behaviour scores of all the students (p=0.185). Conclusion: CHD education may be an effective intervention for increasing CHD knowledge in female students. However, this increased CHD knowledge did not promote positive lifestyle behaviours in these female students, suggesting that other interventions may be required to promote positive lifestyle behaviours.
Advisors:
Fallows, Stephen
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Sep-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/211351
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorFallows, Stephenen
dc.contributor.authorLyle, Jacquelineen
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T09:06:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-20T09:06:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-09-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/211351-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To evaluate the levels of CHD knowledge and self-reported health behaviours in first year female HSC students attending South Lanarkshire College in Scotland. Identify if a relationship exists between the students levels of CHD knowledge and their self-reported health behaviours and identify if a significant difference exists in the CHD knowledge and health behaviours of students who have undertaken a CHD knowledge module as part of their course of study compared to students who have not undertaken the CHD knowledge module as part of their course of study. As it has been suggested that knowledge may be a pre-requisite to positive health behaviour change, which is a key component in the prevention of CHD. Methods: First year Health and Social Care Further Education College Students at a Scottish College were asked to complete a modified CHD knowledge and self-reported health behaviour questionnaire. One-point was awarded for each CHD knowledge question answered correctly, these points were then totaled and students were given a coronary heart disease knowledge score out of a possible score of 52. One-point was also awarded for each positive health behaviour reported, which were then totaled and students were given a health behaviour score out of a possible score of 10. These scores were then used for comparison between the students. Results: One-hundred and eight students took part in the study. Students who received the CHD knowledge module had significantly greater CHD knowledge scores than the students who did not receive the CHD knowledge module (p=0.0001). However, there was no significant difference between the health behaviour scores of students who had received the CHD knowledge module and students who had not received the CHD knowledge module (p=0.742). No relationship was found between the CHD knowledge scores and health behaviour scores of all the students (p=0.185). Conclusion: CHD education may be an effective intervention for increasing CHD knowledge in female students. However, this increased CHD knowledge did not promote positive lifestyle behaviours in these female students, suggesting that other interventions may be required to promote positive lifestyle behaviours.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.rightsContains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v1.0. Crown copyright. Data supplied by National Records of Scotland.en
dc.subjectcoronary heary diseaseen
dc.subjectawarenessen
dc.subjecthealth behavioursen
dc.subjectfemalesen
dc.subjectstudentsen
dc.subjectScotlanden
dc.titleCoronary heart disease (CHD) knowledge and self-reported health of female students attending a Scottish collegeen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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