Violence and under-reporting: Learning disability nursing and the impact of environment, experience and banding

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/190529
Title:
Violence and under-reporting: Learning disability nursing and the impact of environment, experience and banding
Authors:
Lovell, Andy; Skellern, Joanne; Mason, Tom
Abstract:
The study explores the implications of a survey into the discrepancy between actual and reported incidents of violence, perpetrated by service users, within the learning disability division of one mental health NHS Trust. Violence within the NHS continues to constitute a significant issue, especially within mental health and learning disability services where incidence remains disproportionately high despite the context of zero tolerance. A whole-population survey of 411 nurses working within a variety of settings within the learning disability division of one mental health NHS Trust. A questionnaire was administered to learning disability nursing staff working in community, respite, residential, assessment and treatment and medium secure settings, yielding a response rate of approximately 40%. There were distinct differences in the levels of violence reported within specific specialist services along with variation between these areas according to clinical environment, years of experience and nursing band. The study does not support previous findings whereby unqualified nurses experienced more incidents of violence than qualified nurses. The situation was less clear, complicated by the interrelationship between years of nursing experience, nursing band and clinical environment. The conclusions suggest that the increased emphasis on reducing violent incidents has been fairly successful with staff reporting adequate preparation for responding to specific incidents and being well supported by colleagues, managers and the organisation. The differences between specific clinical environments, however, constituted a worrying finding with implications for skill mix and staff education. The study raises questions about the relationship between the qualified nurse and the individual with a learning disability in the context of violence and according to specific circumstances of care delivery. The relationship is clearly not a simple one, and this group of nurses’ understanding and expectations of tolerance requires further research; violence is clearly never acceptable, but these nurses appear reluctant to condemn and attribute culpability.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Journal of Clinical Nursing, 2011, 20(23-24), pp. 3304-3312
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Journal of Clinical Nursing
Publication Date:
23-Nov-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/190529
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03875.x
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0962-1067
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is the authors' version of an article published in the Journal of Clinical Nursing. The definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com
ISSN:
0962-1067
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLovell, Andyen
dc.contributor.authorSkellern, Joanneen
dc.contributor.authorMason, Tomen
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-23T11:20:09Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-23T11:20:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-23T11:20:09Z-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Nursing, 2011, 20(23-24), pp. 3304-3312en
dc.identifier.issn0962-1067-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03875.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/190529-
dc.descriptionThis is the authors' version of an article published in the Journal of Clinical Nursing. The definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.comen
dc.description.abstractThe study explores the implications of a survey into the discrepancy between actual and reported incidents of violence, perpetrated by service users, within the learning disability division of one mental health NHS Trust. Violence within the NHS continues to constitute a significant issue, especially within mental health and learning disability services where incidence remains disproportionately high despite the context of zero tolerance. A whole-population survey of 411 nurses working within a variety of settings within the learning disability division of one mental health NHS Trust. A questionnaire was administered to learning disability nursing staff working in community, respite, residential, assessment and treatment and medium secure settings, yielding a response rate of approximately 40%. There were distinct differences in the levels of violence reported within specific specialist services along with variation between these areas according to clinical environment, years of experience and nursing band. The study does not support previous findings whereby unqualified nurses experienced more incidents of violence than qualified nurses. The situation was less clear, complicated by the interrelationship between years of nursing experience, nursing band and clinical environment. The conclusions suggest that the increased emphasis on reducing violent incidents has been fairly successful with staff reporting adequate preparation for responding to specific incidents and being well supported by colleagues, managers and the organisation. The differences between specific clinical environments, however, constituted a worrying finding with implications for skill mix and staff education. The study raises questions about the relationship between the qualified nurse and the individual with a learning disability in the context of violence and according to specific circumstances of care delivery. The relationship is clearly not a simple one, and this group of nurses’ understanding and expectations of tolerance requires further research; violence is clearly never acceptable, but these nurses appear reluctant to condemn and attribute culpability.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0962-1067en
dc.subjectlearning disabilityen
dc.subjectnursesen
dc.subjectnursingen
dc.subjectstaff experienceen
dc.subjectviolenceen
dc.subjectworkplace reportingen
dc.subjectzero toleranceen
dc.titleViolence and under-reporting: Learning disability nursing and the impact of environment, experience and bandingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Clinical Nursingen
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