An investigation into counsellors’ perspectives of working with multicultural worldview: A qualitative study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/140792
Title:
An investigation into counsellors’ perspectives of working with multicultural worldview: A qualitative study
Authors:
Mason, Richard S.
Abstract:
This qualitative study aimed to explore counsellor’s perspectives of working with multicultural worldview. The literature reviewed is from the cultural and counselling psychology base, and is biased towards the client perspective and predominantly US based. Whilst not directly informing the question within the aims of the study, it provides a valuable and informative insight into the subject of worldview and validates worldview as a subject worthy of investigation from the counsellor’s perspective. Drawing on data captured from recorded semi-structured interviews with counsellors, transcripts were analysed using the constant comparative method. Ethical considerations are addressed, and a reflexive account provided by the researcher. Findings are presented in narrative form, including supportive quotations taken from the recorded interviews. Main overview of findings: Participants focussed on client worldview rather than culture. Participants suspended their own worldview when working with clients, this was more important when working with clients who have very different worldviews to the counsellor. The degree of worldview suspension was dependent on the model in which the counsellor was working. The efficacy of recommendations that counsellors should immerse themselves in client culture to aid multicultural counselling competence was challenged. Empathy was used as a guide to how well the counsellor understood client worldview. Individualist participants tended to be more stable in worldview perception that collectivist participants. Participant worldview hybridity was explored and an explanation offered in relation to the links between modality, counsellor worldview, motivational ethos, and the theory of cultural accommodation. An informed and pertinent discussion of the findings, limitations of the study and implications for practice are presented. Conclusion: The study highlights the importance of worldview. It is implied that, irrespective of a client’s culture, race or ethnicity, multi-cultural counselling practice could be improved by the counsellor’s perceptive use of their own, and their client’s worldview in the counselling relationship.
Advisors:
Mintz, Rita
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Nov-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/140792
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMintz, Ritaen
dc.contributor.authorMason, Richard S.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T08:59:06Zen
dc.date.available2011-08-26T08:59:06Zen
dc.date.issued2010-11en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/140792en
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative study aimed to explore counsellor’s perspectives of working with multicultural worldview. The literature reviewed is from the cultural and counselling psychology base, and is biased towards the client perspective and predominantly US based. Whilst not directly informing the question within the aims of the study, it provides a valuable and informative insight into the subject of worldview and validates worldview as a subject worthy of investigation from the counsellor’s perspective. Drawing on data captured from recorded semi-structured interviews with counsellors, transcripts were analysed using the constant comparative method. Ethical considerations are addressed, and a reflexive account provided by the researcher. Findings are presented in narrative form, including supportive quotations taken from the recorded interviews. Main overview of findings: Participants focussed on client worldview rather than culture. Participants suspended their own worldview when working with clients, this was more important when working with clients who have very different worldviews to the counsellor. The degree of worldview suspension was dependent on the model in which the counsellor was working. The efficacy of recommendations that counsellors should immerse themselves in client culture to aid multicultural counselling competence was challenged. Empathy was used as a guide to how well the counsellor understood client worldview. Individualist participants tended to be more stable in worldview perception that collectivist participants. Participant worldview hybridity was explored and an explanation offered in relation to the links between modality, counsellor worldview, motivational ethos, and the theory of cultural accommodation. An informed and pertinent discussion of the findings, limitations of the study and implications for practice are presented. Conclusion: The study highlights the importance of worldview. It is implied that, irrespective of a client’s culture, race or ethnicity, multi-cultural counselling practice could be improved by the counsellor’s perceptive use of their own, and their client’s worldview in the counselling relationship.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectmulticulturalen
dc.subjectclient worldviewen
dc.titleAn investigation into counsellors’ perspectives of working with multicultural worldview: A qualitative studyen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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