Ergogenic efficacy of honey based sports drink during a simulated 56 mile cycling time trial

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/133872
Title:
Ergogenic efficacy of honey based sports drink during a simulated 56 mile cycling time trial
Authors:
Mayhew, Ian
Abstract:
This study examined the ergogenic benefits derived from the consumption of a honey based sports drink during a simulated 56- mile cycle time trial conducted under thermoneutral conditions. Flavouring was added to all three drinks to reduce the risk of organoleptic recognition. Specifically, this research examined the use of honey as an ergogenic aid compared to a commercially available carbohydrate sports drink mix (Jo Friel Heat) and a water based placebo. Six trained endurance cyclists cycled on three different occasions for 56 miles. The trials were conducted in random order, during which the subjects consumed 900ml of fluid every hour, consumed ad libitum every 20minutes from three equal aliquots. Carbohydrate intake in each of the carbohydrate- based solutions was maintained at 60g per hour. During exercise power output was monitored continuously, whilst aural temperature, blood glucose, heart rate, gastric discomfort, respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded every 20 minutes. Both carbohydrate interventions were significantly better at maintaining blood glucose levels during the course of the trial and produced significantly lower average body temperature compared to the water-based placebo. No significant differences were observed in respect of performance between the three trials (Honey 2hrs 37mins 17 sees; Heat 2hrs 36mins 27 sees; and, placebo 2hrs 38mins 17 sees, p > 0.05). The data suggests that honey is able to offer similar ergogenic properties during prolonged exercise to commercially available sports drinks.
Advisors:
Fallows, Stephen; Morris, Mike
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Nov-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/133872
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Sponsors:
This study was supported by a grant from Rio San Pedro Honey, Chile.
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorFallows, Stephenen
dc.contributor.advisorMorris, Mikeen
dc.contributor.authorMayhew, Ianen
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-20T13:04:31Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-20T13:04:31Z-
dc.date.issued2007-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/133872-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the ergogenic benefits derived from the consumption of a honey based sports drink during a simulated 56- mile cycle time trial conducted under thermoneutral conditions. Flavouring was added to all three drinks to reduce the risk of organoleptic recognition. Specifically, this research examined the use of honey as an ergogenic aid compared to a commercially available carbohydrate sports drink mix (Jo Friel Heat) and a water based placebo. Six trained endurance cyclists cycled on three different occasions for 56 miles. The trials were conducted in random order, during which the subjects consumed 900ml of fluid every hour, consumed ad libitum every 20minutes from three equal aliquots. Carbohydrate intake in each of the carbohydrate- based solutions was maintained at 60g per hour. During exercise power output was monitored continuously, whilst aural temperature, blood glucose, heart rate, gastric discomfort, respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded every 20 minutes. Both carbohydrate interventions were significantly better at maintaining blood glucose levels during the course of the trial and produced significantly lower average body temperature compared to the water-based placebo. No significant differences were observed in respect of performance between the three trials (Honey 2hrs 37mins 17 sees; Heat 2hrs 36mins 27 sees; and, placebo 2hrs 38mins 17 sees, p > 0.05). The data suggests that honey is able to offer similar ergogenic properties during prolonged exercise to commercially available sports drinks.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by a grant from Rio San Pedro Honey, Chile.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectsports drinksen
dc.subjecthoneyen
dc.titleErgogenic efficacy of honey based sports drink during a simulated 56 mile cycling time trialen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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