Are reference nutrient intakes for key micronutrients and macronutrients set by COMA (1991) met and are their importance understood among pregnant women, attending antenatal clinics in Liverpool

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/129518
Title:
Are reference nutrient intakes for key micronutrients and macronutrients set by COMA (1991) met and are their importance understood among pregnant women, attending antenatal clinics in Liverpool
Authors:
Currie, Lindsey
Abstract:
Introduction: The aim of this project was to investigate if intakes of key micronutrients and macronutrients during pregnancy reflect the understanding of specific micronutrients and macronutrients. The study further hypothesised if age, marital status, occupation, trimester of pregnancy, number of previous pregnancies and smoking affects total micronutrient and macronutrient intake and affects understanding of key micronutrients and macronutrients. Design: A prospective observational study. Subjects and methods: Pregnant women (n=47) were recruited from 3 different antenatal classes across Merseyside, UK. Subjects completed a non validated questionnaire and 3 day food diary. Questionnaires were analysed using SPSS and intakes were analysed using dietary analysis software. Results: Occupation had a significant positive influence on dietary micronutrient intakes (p=0.004). Occupation had further affects on nutritional knowledge (p=0.009). Other significant differences were established between trimester and mean dietary intakes (p=0.008). The majority of mean intakes of micronutrients and macronutrients were lower than UK recommendations set by COMA (1991) for pregnant women. Conclusion: It was concluded from this study that intakes of key micronutrients and macronutrients during pregnancy did not reflect the understanding of specific micronutrients and macronutrients. The participants from this study possessed a sound understanding of food sources for the different micronutrients and macronutrients. However it appears that this did not influence dietary intake, as RNIs in general were lower than recommended.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
1-Dec-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/129518
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCurrie, Lindseyen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-13T10:44:15Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-13T10:44:15Zen
dc.date.issued2010-12-01en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/129518en
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The aim of this project was to investigate if intakes of key micronutrients and macronutrients during pregnancy reflect the understanding of specific micronutrients and macronutrients. The study further hypothesised if age, marital status, occupation, trimester of pregnancy, number of previous pregnancies and smoking affects total micronutrient and macronutrient intake and affects understanding of key micronutrients and macronutrients. Design: A prospective observational study. Subjects and methods: Pregnant women (n=47) were recruited from 3 different antenatal classes across Merseyside, UK. Subjects completed a non validated questionnaire and 3 day food diary. Questionnaires were analysed using SPSS and intakes were analysed using dietary analysis software. Results: Occupation had a significant positive influence on dietary micronutrient intakes (p=0.004). Occupation had further affects on nutritional knowledge (p=0.009). Other significant differences were established between trimester and mean dietary intakes (p=0.008). The majority of mean intakes of micronutrients and macronutrients were lower than UK recommendations set by COMA (1991) for pregnant women. Conclusion: It was concluded from this study that intakes of key micronutrients and macronutrients during pregnancy did not reflect the understanding of specific micronutrients and macronutrients. The participants from this study possessed a sound understanding of food sources for the different micronutrients and macronutrients. However it appears that this did not influence dietary intake, as RNIs in general were lower than recommended.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectmicronutrientsen
dc.subjectmacronutrientsen
dc.subjectpregnancyen
dc.titleAre reference nutrient intakes for key micronutrients and macronutrients set by COMA (1991) met and are their importance understood among pregnant women, attending antenatal clinics in Liverpoolen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
dc.description.advisorMustaq, Sohailen
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