A study investigating the effects of the PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies) curriculum on the child's emotional and behavioural development as perceived by the child's class teacher

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/119729
Title:
A study investigating the effects of the PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies) curriculum on the child's emotional and behavioural development as perceived by the child's class teacher
Authors:
Cairns, Dianne
Abstract:
Recent reports detail the growing concern of mental health difficulties among children and adolescents (DfES 2001, NAfW Everybody's Business, 2001). Schools are considered an ideal location for the prevention, early identification and treatment of children's difficulties. Increasingly schools are using counsellors to help work with children with emotional and behavioural difficulties. However, there is limited information around the effectiveness of school-based interventions. The PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies), (Greenberg & Kusche, 1994) Curriculum is a comprehensive programme for promoting emotional and social competencies and reducing aggression and behaviour problems in primary school-aged children. Designed to be delivered by class teachers to primary school aged children, evaluations have demonstrated significant improvements in children's emotional and behavioural development on a variety of sites in America but to date, to the author's knowledge, there is no published research in the UK. This study examines the short-term effectiveness of the PATHS curriculum as perceived by the child's class teacher. The study is a pre and post intervention study comprising of 5 schools, 13 teachers and 313 children. The authors of PATHS advise delivery of the programme to be at least 2-3 times per week, throughout the child's primary school education. The majority of the teachers in this study were only able to deliver the programme once a week, and the intervention period was brief, (October 2001- July 2002). However, despite these limitations, the findings indicate improvements on teacher ratings of emotional awareness, behavioural difficulties, peer relationships and children's self esteem. The results are discussed in terms of the efficacy of the measures, the limitations of the study and the implications for teachers, counsellors and future research.
Advisors:
Mintz, Rita
Publisher:
University of Liverpool (Chester College of Higher Education)
Publication Date:
Nov-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/119729
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMintz, Ritaen
dc.contributor.authorCairns, Dianneen
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-18T17:17:05Z-
dc.date.available2011-01-18T17:17:05Z-
dc.date.issued2002-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/119729-
dc.description.abstractRecent reports detail the growing concern of mental health difficulties among children and adolescents (DfES 2001, NAfW Everybody's Business, 2001). Schools are considered an ideal location for the prevention, early identification and treatment of children's difficulties. Increasingly schools are using counsellors to help work with children with emotional and behavioural difficulties. However, there is limited information around the effectiveness of school-based interventions. The PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies), (Greenberg & Kusche, 1994) Curriculum is a comprehensive programme for promoting emotional and social competencies and reducing aggression and behaviour problems in primary school-aged children. Designed to be delivered by class teachers to primary school aged children, evaluations have demonstrated significant improvements in children's emotional and behavioural development on a variety of sites in America but to date, to the author's knowledge, there is no published research in the UK. This study examines the short-term effectiveness of the PATHS curriculum as perceived by the child's class teacher. The study is a pre and post intervention study comprising of 5 schools, 13 teachers and 313 children. The authors of PATHS advise delivery of the programme to be at least 2-3 times per week, throughout the child's primary school education. The majority of the teachers in this study were only able to deliver the programme once a week, and the intervention period was brief, (October 2001- July 2002). However, despite these limitations, the findings indicate improvements on teacher ratings of emotional awareness, behavioural difficulties, peer relationships and children's self esteem. The results are discussed in terms of the efficacy of the measures, the limitations of the study and the implications for teachers, counsellors and future research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Liverpool (Chester College of Higher Education)en
dc.subjectPromoting Alternative Thinking Strategiesen
dc.subjectbehavourial developmenten
dc.subjectchildrenen
dc.titleA study investigating the effects of the PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies) curriculum on the child's emotional and behavioural development as perceived by the child's class teacheren
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.publisher.departmentFlintshire Primary Care Service for Childrenen
dc.type.qualificationnameMAen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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