Psychosocial characteristics of patients seeking weight loss surgery

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/114779
Title:
Psychosocial characteristics of patients seeking weight loss surgery
Authors:
Calow, Jane
Abstract:
This study investigated the relationships between BMI, gender and depression, anxiety, self-esteem and disordered eating in people seeking weight loss (bariatric) surgery. The aim was to increase understanding of these relationships to improve selection of patients suitable for surgery. The study was a retrospective audit of data from 199 females and 59 males (mean BMI 48.3 ± 8.1kg/m²) who attended for surgical pre-assessment. Subjects completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), The Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite (IWQOL-Lite) and the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh (BITE). Spearman’s correlations were used to investigate the relationships between BMI and the HADS anxiety and depression scores, the IWQOL-Lite self-esteem scores and the BITE symptom scale disordered eating scores. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to investigate gender differences in the psychosocial scores. There was no significant relationship between BMI and anxiety (r=-0.39; p=0.532), BMI and depression (r=-0.101; p=0.106), BMI and self- esteem (r=-0.017; p=0.788) or BMI and disordered eating (r=-0.109; p=0.081). There was a significant difference in HADS anxiety scores (p=0.004) between males (median=9) and females (median=12) and in IWQOL-Lite self-esteem scores (p=0.0005) between males (median=28) and females (median=33). There was no significant gender difference in HADS depression scores (p=0.03) or in BITE disordered eating scores (p=0.028). There was a significant difference in BMI (p=0.001) between males (median 49.5 kg/m²) and females (median 46.0 kg/m²). The results indicated that females seeking bariatric surgery were significantly more anxious and had lower self-esteem than males, and they had significantly lower BMIs than males. There was a weak negative correlation between BMI and the psychosocial scores indicating that people may be less distressed at higher BMIs but these results were not significant. Further research should investigate the relationships between the psychosocial variables in greater depth, to improve patient selection and outcomes after bariatric surgery.
Advisors:
Fallows, Stephen
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Jul-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/114779
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorFallows, Stephenen
dc.contributor.authorCalow, Janeen
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-05T12:40:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-11-05T12:40:58Z-
dc.date.issued2009-07-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/114779-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the relationships between BMI, gender and depression, anxiety, self-esteem and disordered eating in people seeking weight loss (bariatric) surgery. The aim was to increase understanding of these relationships to improve selection of patients suitable for surgery. The study was a retrospective audit of data from 199 females and 59 males (mean BMI 48.3 ± 8.1kg/m²) who attended for surgical pre-assessment. Subjects completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), The Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite (IWQOL-Lite) and the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh (BITE). Spearman’s correlations were used to investigate the relationships between BMI and the HADS anxiety and depression scores, the IWQOL-Lite self-esteem scores and the BITE symptom scale disordered eating scores. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to investigate gender differences in the psychosocial scores. There was no significant relationship between BMI and anxiety (r=-0.39; p=0.532), BMI and depression (r=-0.101; p=0.106), BMI and self- esteem (r=-0.017; p=0.788) or BMI and disordered eating (r=-0.109; p=0.081). There was a significant difference in HADS anxiety scores (p=0.004) between males (median=9) and females (median=12) and in IWQOL-Lite self-esteem scores (p=0.0005) between males (median=28) and females (median=33). There was no significant gender difference in HADS depression scores (p=0.03) or in BITE disordered eating scores (p=0.028). There was a significant difference in BMI (p=0.001) between males (median 49.5 kg/m²) and females (median 46.0 kg/m²). The results indicated that females seeking bariatric surgery were significantly more anxious and had lower self-esteem than males, and they had significantly lower BMIs than males. There was a weak negative correlation between BMI and the psychosocial scores indicating that people may be less distressed at higher BMIs but these results were not significant. Further research should investigate the relationships between the psychosocial variables in greater depth, to improve patient selection and outcomes after bariatric surgery.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectweight loss surgeryen
dc.titlePsychosocial characteristics of patients seeking weight loss surgeryen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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