Has the introduction to homogenous business management structures improved flexibility in Liverpool City Council?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/108822
Title:
Has the introduction to homogenous business management structures improved flexibility in Liverpool City Council?
Authors:
Malloy, Bill
Abstract:
May 2010 saw the emergence of a hung parliament from the general elections. The public had exercised their right to vote and made their decision. It is now the duty of the elected members of parliament to form a government that will govern in the interest of the country. With a mountainous financial burden hanging over the nation, it has never been more important for public sector organisations to deliver value for money and maximise performance. All political parties have indicated that there will be cuts in the public sector and have recognised that the public sector will have to shrink, yet still deliver essential services. This will involve a reshaping of the public sector, with fewer staff delivering services. It will require a more business oriented approach to service delivery with economies of scale and efficiency drives. It will require structural changes with multi-skilled staff delivering a more flexible approach to service delivery. Such a change has already taken place within Liverpool City Council. The old council service structures have been replaced with new business unit structures. But has the introduction of business units changed the way we work? Has it improved services? Has it improved the flexibility? In this study we shall consider the flexibility issue. We shall develop a flexibility measurement model and put the new structure to the test.
Advisors:
Webb, Paul
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Jun-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/108822
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorWebb, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorMalloy, Billen
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-02T13:06:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-02T13:06:33Z-
dc.date.issued2010-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/108822-
dc.description.abstractMay 2010 saw the emergence of a hung parliament from the general elections. The public had exercised their right to vote and made their decision. It is now the duty of the elected members of parliament to form a government that will govern in the interest of the country. With a mountainous financial burden hanging over the nation, it has never been more important for public sector organisations to deliver value for money and maximise performance. All political parties have indicated that there will be cuts in the public sector and have recognised that the public sector will have to shrink, yet still deliver essential services. This will involve a reshaping of the public sector, with fewer staff delivering services. It will require a more business oriented approach to service delivery with economies of scale and efficiency drives. It will require structural changes with multi-skilled staff delivering a more flexible approach to service delivery. Such a change has already taken place within Liverpool City Council. The old council service structures have been replaced with new business unit structures. But has the introduction of business units changed the way we work? Has it improved services? Has it improved the flexibility? In this study we shall consider the flexibility issue. We shall develop a flexibility measurement model and put the new structure to the test.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectpublic sectoren
dc.subjectflexibilityen
dc.titleHas the introduction to homogenous business management structures improved flexibility in Liverpool City Council?en
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.publisher.departmentLiverpool City Councilen
dc.type.qualificationnameMBAen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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