A case study on the potential to improve service delivery by introducing a 'virtual' contact centre

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/100375
Title:
A case study on the potential to improve service delivery by introducing a 'virtual' contact centre
Authors:
Trevor, Jennifer
Abstract:
The piloting of a 'Virtual' Contact Centre (VCC) was identified at Flintshire County Council as a priority for an Access To Services Review. This would offer the customer an alternative method of contacting the Council, to request service and information. What did not necessarily follow was that the actual service received would be to the improved satisfaction of the customer. The research topic was therefore to determine whether improved access to services by means of a Virtual' Contact Centre actually improved service delivery. The research was undertaken using a 'pilot' Case Study of an implementation in Flintshire County Council between 2002 and 2004. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collated through consultation and interview, and investigated and analysed in tandem with a literature review. The main finding of the study was that the 'pilot' Case Study had not produced significant evidence to wholly support the claim. However, the analysis of the data had indicated that the VCC provided a welcome alternative means of contacting the Council. It was clear from the study that the VCC facility was being used, though it would appear that some access channels had been more popular than others. Thus, although the hypothesis was not fully proven, there was clear evidence of the potential for improvement in customer satisfaction being realised through a VCC. Recommendations are proposed to address the issues.
Publisher:
University of Liverpool (University College Chester)
Publication Date:
Oct-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/100375
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTrevor, Jenniferen
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-07T08:29:03Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-07T08:29:03Z-
dc.date.issued2004-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/100375-
dc.description.abstractThe piloting of a 'Virtual' Contact Centre (VCC) was identified at Flintshire County Council as a priority for an Access To Services Review. This would offer the customer an alternative method of contacting the Council, to request service and information. What did not necessarily follow was that the actual service received would be to the improved satisfaction of the customer. The research topic was therefore to determine whether improved access to services by means of a Virtual' Contact Centre actually improved service delivery. The research was undertaken using a 'pilot' Case Study of an implementation in Flintshire County Council between 2002 and 2004. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collated through consultation and interview, and investigated and analysed in tandem with a literature review. The main finding of the study was that the 'pilot' Case Study had not produced significant evidence to wholly support the claim. However, the analysis of the data had indicated that the VCC provided a welcome alternative means of contacting the Council. It was clear from the study that the VCC facility was being used, though it would appear that some access channels had been more popular than others. Thus, although the hypothesis was not fully proven, there was clear evidence of the potential for improvement in customer satisfaction being realised through a VCC. Recommendations are proposed to address the issues.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Liverpool (University College Chester)en
dc.subjectvirtual contact centreen
dc.subjectservice deliveryen
dc.titleA case study on the potential to improve service delivery by introducing a 'virtual' contact centreen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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