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ChesterRep is the University of Chester's institutional repository and an online platform designed to collate, store, and aid discoverability of research carried out at the university to the wider research community

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  • From Surveillance to Intervention: Overview and Baseline Findings for the Active City of Liverpool Active Schools and SportsLinx (A-CLASS) Project.

    McWhannell, Nicola; email: n.mcwhannell@chester.ac.uk; Foweather, Lawrence; orcid: 0000-0001-9851-5421; email: L.Foweather@ljmu.ac.uk; Graves, Lee E F; orcid: 0000-0002-3323-313X; email: L.E.Graves@ljmu.ac.uk; Henaghan, Jayne L; email: jaynehenaghan@googlemail.com; Ridgers, Nicola D; orcid: 0000-0001-5713-3515; email: nicky.ridgers@deakin.edu.au; Stratton, Gareth; orcid: 0000-0001-5618-0803; email: G.Stratton@swansea.ac.uk (2018-03-23)
    This paper outlines the implementation of a programme of work that started with the development of a population-level children's health, fitness and lifestyle study in 1996 (SportsLinx) leading to selected interventions one of which is described in detail: the Active City of Liverpool, Active Schools and SportsLinx (A-CLASS) Project. The A-CLASS Project aimed to quantify the effectiveness of structured and unstructured physical activity (PA) programmes on children's PA, fitness, body composition, bone health, cardiac and vascular structures, fundamental movement skills, physical self-perception and self-esteem. The study was a four-arm parallel-group school-based cluster randomised controlled trial (clinical trials no. NCT02963805), and compared different exposure groups: a high intensity PA (HIPA) group, a fundamental movement skill (FMS) group, a PA signposting (PASS) group and a control group, in a two-schools-per-condition design. Baseline findings indicate that children's fundamental movement skill competence levels are low-to-moderate, yet these skills are inversely associated with percentage body fat. Outcomes of this project will make an important contribution to the design and implementation of children's PA promotion initiatives.
  • Next-Generation Additive Manufacturing of Complete Standalone Sodium-Ion Energy Storage Architectures

    Down, Michael P.; Martínez-Periñán, Emiliano; Foster, Christopher W.; Lorenzo, Encarnación; Smith, G. C.; Banks, Craig E.; orcid: 0000-0002-0756-9764 (Wiley, 2019-02-10)
  • Bordered Constructions of Self-Dual Codes from Group Rings and New Extremal Binary Self-Dual Codes

    Dougherty, Steven; Gildea, Joe; Kaya, Abidin; Korban, Adrian; Tylyshchak, Alexander; Yildiz, Bahattin; University of Scranton; University of Chester; Sampoerna Academy; Uzhgorod State University; Northern Arizona University (Elsevier, 2019)
    We introduce a bordered construction over group rings for self-dual codes. We apply the constructions over the binary field and the ring $\F_2+u\F_2$, using groups of orders 9, 15, 21, 25, 27, 33 and 35 to find extremal binary self-dual codes of lengths 20, 32, 40, 44, 52, 56, 64, 68, 88 and best known binary self-dual codes of length 72. In particular we obtain 41 new binary extremal self-dual codes of length 68 from groups of orders 15 and 33 using neighboring and extensions. All the numerical results are tabulated throughout the paper.
  • Stigma: a linguistic analysis of the UK red-top tabloids press’s representation of schizophrenia

    Bowen, Matt; Kinderman, Peter; Cooke, Anne; University of Chester; Liverpool University; Canterbury University (SAGE publications, 2019)
    Aims. Media representations of mental health problems may influence readers’ understanding of, and attitude towards, people who have received psychiatric diagnoses. Negative beliefs and attitudes may then lead to discriminatory behaviour, which is understood as stigma. This study explored the language used in popular national newspapers when writing about schizophrenia and considered how this may have contributed to the processes of stigmatisation towards people with this diagnosis. Methods. Using corpus linguistic methods, a sample of newspaper articles over a 24 month period that mentioned the word ‘schizophrenia’ was compared with a similar sample of articles about diabetes. This enabled a theory-driven exploration of linguistic characteristics to explore stigmatising messages, whilst supported by statistical tests (Log-Likelihood) to compare the data sets and identify words with a high relative frequency. Results. Analysis of the ‘schizophrenia’ data set identified that overtly stigmatising language (e.g. “schizo”) was relatively infrequent, but that there was frequent use of linguistic signatures of violence. Articles frequently used graphic language referring to: acts of violence, descriptions of violent acts, implements used in violence, identity labels and exemplars of well-known individuals who had committed violent acts. The word ‘schizophrenic’ was used with a high frequency (n=108) and most commonly to name individuals who had committed acts of violence. Discussion. The study suggests that whilst the press have largely avoided the use of words that press guidance has steered them away from (e.g. “schizo” and “psycho”) that they still use a range of graphic language to present people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia as frighteningly ‘other’ and as prone to violence. This repetition of negative stereotypical messages may well contribute to the processes of stigmatisation many people who experience psychosis have to contend.
  • Internal loads, but not external loads and fatigue, are similar in young and middle-aged resistance trained males during high volume squatting exercise.

    Fernandes, John; Lamb, Kevin; Twist, Craig; University of Chester (MDPI Basel, 2018-08-22)
    Little is known about the internal and external loads experienced during resistance exercise, or the subsequent fatigue-related response, across different age groups. This study compared the internal (heart rate, OMNI ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), session RPE) and external loads (peak velocity and power and volume load) during high volume squatting exercise (10 10 at 60% one-repetition maximum (1RM)) and the fatigue-related response (maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), resting doublet force, peak power, and blood lactate) in young (n = 9; age 22.3 1.7 years) and middle-aged (n = 9; age 39.9 6.2 years) resistance-trained males. All internal load variables and peak velocity illustrated unclear differences between groups during exercise. Peak power and volume load were likely higher in the young group compared to their middle-aged counterparts. The unclear differences in MVC, VA and blood lactate between groups after exercise were accompanied by very likely greater decrements in resting doublet force and peak power at 20 and 80% 1RM in the middle-aged group compared to the young group. These data indicate that internal load is not different between young and middle-aged resistance-trained males, though certain external load measures and the fatigue response are.

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