What is the impact of a peer counselling approach to help vulnerable children during lunchtimes?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/85611
Title:
What is the impact of a peer counselling approach to help vulnerable children during lunchtimes?
Authors:
Tindall, Angela Mary
Abstract:
There are many forms of peer support and collaboration projects and they are becoming increasingly popular throughout the world in both secondary and primary school. Peer counselling is individualised and palliative and this study examines the impact of four trained Year 5 and Year 6 counsellors on four Year 4 and Year 5 vulnerable, marginalised children with an extremely low sociometric status, who would become the focus group. The aim of the study was to increase prosocial interactions of the focus group. Sociometric testing was used before the project in order to identify the focus group and counsellors. Sociometric testing was used after the project to assess the impact of the intervention. Behavioural observations and questionnaires were also used to provide variable support for the projects effectiveness. Although two of the focus group left before the end of the project, the outcome was that positive interactions with peer counsellors and other children in the playground during lunchtimes very gradually increased. One child of the two remaining had a higher social status at the end of the project. Peer counselling proved a very useful model for a healthier world outside the classroom and a useful supplement to existing pastoral and inclusive strategies.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Issue Date:
Nov-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/85611
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
MPhil / PhD Theses and Masters dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTindall, Angela Maryen
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-06T17:56:03Z-
dc.date.available2009-11-06T17:56:03Z-
dc.date.issued2008-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/85611-
dc.description.abstractThere are many forms of peer support and collaboration projects and they are becoming increasingly popular throughout the world in both secondary and primary school. Peer counselling is individualised and palliative and this study examines the impact of four trained Year 5 and Year 6 counsellors on four Year 4 and Year 5 vulnerable, marginalised children with an extremely low sociometric status, who would become the focus group. The aim of the study was to increase prosocial interactions of the focus group. Sociometric testing was used before the project in order to identify the focus group and counsellors. Sociometric testing was used after the project to assess the impact of the intervention. Behavioural observations and questionnaires were also used to provide variable support for the projects effectiveness. Although two of the focus group left before the end of the project, the outcome was that positive interactions with peer counsellors and other children in the playground during lunchtimes very gradually increased. One child of the two remaining had a higher social status at the end of the project. Peer counselling proved a very useful model for a healthier world outside the classroom and a useful supplement to existing pastoral and inclusive strategies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectpeer counsellingen
dc.subjectvulnerable childrenen
dc.titleWhat is the impact of a peer counselling approach to help vulnerable children during lunchtimes?en
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMEden
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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