Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/76735
Title:
Daniel's story: Self-injury and the case study as method
Authors:
Lovell, Andy
Abstract:
This journal article explores the value of case study methodology as a means of investigating the relationship between people with learning disabilities and self-injury. One life story might appear to be of limited value in this regard; however, it is argued that it might not only be of use in demonstrating the development of an isolated self-injuring career, but there may also be insights into its entrenchment in the lives of others. The telling of one story might serve as a filter, through which the interventions of medication, mechanical restraint and behaviourism can be observed over time. Furthermore, studying one life in some detail might be used to illustrate broader concerns about the context of the transition from institutional to community care. The restrictions of such an approach are acknowledged, particularly in the telling of a story where the main character's words cannot be heard, but maybe that is also the point of undertaking research about those at the margins of society.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
British Journal of Nursing, 2006, 15(3), pp. 166-170
Publisher:
Mark Allen Publishing
Journal:
British Journal of Nursing
Issue Date:
Feb-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/76735
Additional Links:
http://www.britishjournalofnursing.com/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article is not available through ChesterRep.
ISSN:
0966-0461
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLovell, Andy-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-07T14:27:32Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-07T14:27:32Z-
dc.date.issued2006-02-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Nursing, 2006, 15(3), pp. 166-170en
dc.identifier.issn0966-0461-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/76735-
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en
dc.description.abstractThis journal article explores the value of case study methodology as a means of investigating the relationship between people with learning disabilities and self-injury. One life story might appear to be of limited value in this regard; however, it is argued that it might not only be of use in demonstrating the development of an isolated self-injuring career, but there may also be insights into its entrenchment in the lives of others. The telling of one story might serve as a filter, through which the interventions of medication, mechanical restraint and behaviourism can be observed over time. Furthermore, studying one life in some detail might be used to illustrate broader concerns about the context of the transition from institutional to community care. The restrictions of such an approach are acknowledged, particularly in the telling of a story where the main character's words cannot be heard, but maybe that is also the point of undertaking research about those at the margins of society.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMark Allen Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.britishjournalofnursing.com/en
dc.subjectself-inflicted injuriesen
dc.titleDaniel's story: Self-injury and the case study as methoden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Nursingen
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