Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/76733
Title:
People with learning disabilities who engage in self-injury
Authors:
Lovell, Andy
Abstract:
This journal article represents some of the findings of the author's research into the relationship between self-injury and learning disability. It identifies the key theoretical discourses associated with the phenomenon, before elaborating on the main principles of each and identifying resultant intervention strategies. These interventions, psychotropic medication, mechanical restraint, and the behavioural approach are subsequently described. Case-study methodology was employed since this enabled the examination over time of these intervention strategies in the lives of individuals fulfilling the necessary criteria of persistent self-injury and significant communication difficulties. The findings of the research suggest a frequently piecemeal approach to self-injury, with arbitrary selection of behavioural intervention approaches, a continued reliance on powerful medication, and ambivalence concerning the use of mechanical restraint. Nurses were often skilled in working from a behavioural perspective, but were hindered by complex family circumstances and a failure to gain the confidence of direct care staff. There was also a lack of appreciation about the relationship between the individual and his/her self-injury, and recognition of the nature of the intransigence.
Affiliation:
University College Chester
Citation:
British Journal of Nursing, 2004, 13(14), pp. 839-844.
Publisher:
Mark Allen Publishing
Journal:
British Journal of Nursing
Issue Date:
Jul-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/76733
Additional Links:
http://www.britishjournalofnursing.com/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article is not available through ChesterRep.
ISSN:
0966-0461
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLovell, Andy-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-07T14:26:31Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-07T14:26:31Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Nursing, 2004, 13(14), pp. 839-844.en
dc.identifier.issn0966-0461-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/76733-
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en
dc.description.abstractThis journal article represents some of the findings of the author's research into the relationship between self-injury and learning disability. It identifies the key theoretical discourses associated with the phenomenon, before elaborating on the main principles of each and identifying resultant intervention strategies. These interventions, psychotropic medication, mechanical restraint, and the behavioural approach are subsequently described. Case-study methodology was employed since this enabled the examination over time of these intervention strategies in the lives of individuals fulfilling the necessary criteria of persistent self-injury and significant communication difficulties. The findings of the research suggest a frequently piecemeal approach to self-injury, with arbitrary selection of behavioural intervention approaches, a continued reliance on powerful medication, and ambivalence concerning the use of mechanical restraint. Nurses were often skilled in working from a behavioural perspective, but were hindered by complex family circumstances and a failure to gain the confidence of direct care staff. There was also a lack of appreciation about the relationship between the individual and his/her self-injury, and recognition of the nature of the intransigence.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMark Allen Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.britishjournalofnursing.com/en
dc.subjectself-inflicted injuriesen
dc.titlePeople with learning disabilities who engage in self-injuryen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Nursingen
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