Influence of environmental factors on the growth and interactions between salt marsh plants: Effects of salinity, sediment and waterlogging

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/74793
Title:
Influence of environmental factors on the growth and interactions between salt marsh plants: Effects of salinity, sediment and waterlogging
Authors:
Huckle, Jonathan M.; Potter, Jacqueline; Marrs, Robert H.
Abstract:
Artificial environmental gradients were established in a series of pot experiments to investigate the effect of salinity, sediment type and waterlogging on the growth, and interactions between Spartina anglica and Puccinellia maritima. In each experiment, one environmental variable was manipulated and plants grown in pairwise combinations to examine the effect of the environmental factor on the intensity of intra- and interspecific interactions, quantified using the Relative Neighbour Effect (RNE) index. 2 Puccinellia was found to exert an asymmetric, one-way competitive dominance above ground over Spartina in experiments where gradients of sediment type and waterlogging were established. The intensity of the competition was highest in conditions with the least abiotic stress and lower or non-existent where stress was increased. 3 The intensity of the above-ground competition was greatest in loam and least in sand sediments. Reduction in competitive intensity in sand was accompanied by an increase in below-ground Spartina biomass and it is suggested that the production of rhizomes is a potential mechanism by which this species can expand vegetatively into areas without competition. 4 Interspecific competition on Spartina from Puccinellia also varied in intensity in the waterlogging experiment, being more intense in non-immersed treatments, where abiotic stress was reduced. 5 The competitive dominance of Puccinellia and the competition avoidance mechanism shown by Spartina in these experiments help to explain the successional interactions between the species along environmental gradients in natural salt marsh communities.
Affiliation:
University College Chester ; University College Chester ; University of Liverpool
Citation:
Journal of Ecology, 2000, 88(3), pp. 492-505
Publisher:
British Ecological Society
Journal:
Journal of Ecology
Publication Date:
21-Jul-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/74793
Additional Links:
http://www.journalofecology.org/view/0/index.html
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article is not available through ChesterRep.
ISSN:
0022-0477
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHuckle, Jonathan M.en
dc.contributor.authorPotter, Jacquelineen
dc.contributor.authorMarrs, Robert H.en
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-21T14:38:50Zen
dc.date.available2009-07-21T14:38:50Zen
dc.date.issued2009-07-21T14:38:50Zen
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Ecology, 2000, 88(3), pp. 492-505en
dc.identifier.issn0022-0477en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/74793en
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en
dc.description.abstractArtificial environmental gradients were established in a series of pot experiments to investigate the effect of salinity, sediment type and waterlogging on the growth, and interactions between Spartina anglica and Puccinellia maritima. In each experiment, one environmental variable was manipulated and plants grown in pairwise combinations to examine the effect of the environmental factor on the intensity of intra- and interspecific interactions, quantified using the Relative Neighbour Effect (RNE) index. 2 Puccinellia was found to exert an asymmetric, one-way competitive dominance above ground over Spartina in experiments where gradients of sediment type and waterlogging were established. The intensity of the competition was highest in conditions with the least abiotic stress and lower or non-existent where stress was increased. 3 The intensity of the above-ground competition was greatest in loam and least in sand sediments. Reduction in competitive intensity in sand was accompanied by an increase in below-ground Spartina biomass and it is suggested that the production of rhizomes is a potential mechanism by which this species can expand vegetatively into areas without competition. 4 Interspecific competition on Spartina from Puccinellia also varied in intensity in the waterlogging experiment, being more intense in non-immersed treatments, where abiotic stress was reduced. 5 The competitive dominance of Puccinellia and the competition avoidance mechanism shown by Spartina in these experiments help to explain the successional interactions between the species along environmental gradients in natural salt marsh communities.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBritish Ecological Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journalofecology.org/view/0/index.htmlen
dc.subjectcompetitive intensityen
dc.subjectinterspecific competitionen
dc.subjectmarsh evelation gradienten
dc.subjectpuccinellias maritimaen
dc.subjectrelative neighbour effecten
dc.subjectspartina anglicaen
dc.titleInfluence of environmental factors on the growth and interactions between salt marsh plants: Effects of salinity, sediment and waterloggingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College Chester ; University College Chester ; University of Liverpoolen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Ecologyen
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