Evaluation of heat shock protein 70 as a biomarker of environmental stress in Fucus serratus and Lemna minor

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/70454
Title:
Evaluation of heat shock protein 70 as a biomarker of environmental stress in Fucus serratus and Lemna minor
Authors:
Ireland, H. Elyse; Harding, Steve J.; Bonwick, Graham A.; Jones, Michael; Smith, Christopher J.; Williams, John H. H.
Abstract:
Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are known to be induced in response to short-term stress. The present study aimed to evaluate the potential of Hsp70 as a biomarker of stress produced by increased temperature, osmotic pressure, and exposure to cadmium and sodium chloride in marine macroalgae and fresh water plant species. An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IC-ELISA) was developed with a working range of 0.025-10 μg ml-1 using a monoclonal antibody raised against purified Hsp70 of Phaseolus aureus (mung bean). Fucus serratus (toothed wrack), Chondrus crispus (Stackhouse or Carrageen moss), Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) and Lemna minor (common duckweed) sample extracts were stressed for up to 24 h and then tested in the IC-ELISA. The presence of Hsp70 and cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by Western blot. The heat shock response was confirmed in each species using a 2-h 42°C treatment. Following heat shock, Hsp70 concentrations increased to a peak at 2 h (F. serratus) or 4 h (L. minor), after which concentrations decreased. Osmotic and cadmium stresses also resulted in elevated Hsp70 concentrations in samples of F. serratus and L. minor when compared with unstressed controls. In both, osmotic and metal stress, the production of Hsp70 increased to a maximum and subsequently decreased as the stressor levels increased. Results suggest that Hsp70 IC-ELISA could potentially be applied to the detection of stress in these aquatic species, although it would probably be most effective when used in conjunction with other measurements to provide a stressor-specific biomarker profile or fingerprint.
Affiliation:
University College Chester
Citation:
Biomarkers, 2004, 9(2), pp. 139-155
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Biomarkers
Publication Date:
Mar-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/70454
DOI:
10.1080/13547500410001732610
Additional Links:
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713693137~db=all
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article is not available through ChesterRep.
ISSN:
1354750X; 13665804
Sponsors:
This article was submitted to the RAE2008 for the University of Chester - Allied Health Professions and Studies.
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIreland, H. Elyseen
dc.contributor.authorHarding, Steve J.en
dc.contributor.authorBonwick, Graham A.en
dc.contributor.authorJones, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Christopher J.en
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, John H. H.en
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-15T11:23:02Zen
dc.date.available2009-06-15T11:23:02Zen
dc.date.issued2004-03en
dc.identifier.citationBiomarkers, 2004, 9(2), pp. 139-155en
dc.identifier.issn1354750Xen
dc.identifier.issn13665804en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13547500410001732610en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/70454en
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en
dc.description.abstractHeat shock proteins (Hsps) are known to be induced in response to short-term stress. The present study aimed to evaluate the potential of Hsp70 as a biomarker of stress produced by increased temperature, osmotic pressure, and exposure to cadmium and sodium chloride in marine macroalgae and fresh water plant species. An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IC-ELISA) was developed with a working range of 0.025-10 μg ml-1 using a monoclonal antibody raised against purified Hsp70 of Phaseolus aureus (mung bean). Fucus serratus (toothed wrack), Chondrus crispus (Stackhouse or Carrageen moss), Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) and Lemna minor (common duckweed) sample extracts were stressed for up to 24 h and then tested in the IC-ELISA. The presence of Hsp70 and cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by Western blot. The heat shock response was confirmed in each species using a 2-h 42°C treatment. Following heat shock, Hsp70 concentrations increased to a peak at 2 h (F. serratus) or 4 h (L. minor), after which concentrations decreased. Osmotic and cadmium stresses also resulted in elevated Hsp70 concentrations in samples of F. serratus and L. minor when compared with unstressed controls. In both, osmotic and metal stress, the production of Hsp70 increased to a maximum and subsequently decreased as the stressor levels increased. Results suggest that Hsp70 IC-ELISA could potentially be applied to the detection of stress in these aquatic species, although it would probably be most effective when used in conjunction with other measurements to provide a stressor-specific biomarker profile or fingerprint.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis article was submitted to the RAE2008 for the University of Chester - Allied Health Professions and Studies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713693137~db=allen
dc.subjectbiomarkeren
dc.subjectheat shock proteinsen
dc.subjectHsp70en
dc.subjectELISAen
dc.subjectLemna minoren
dc.subjectFucus serratusen
dc.titleEvaluation of heat shock protein 70 as a biomarker of environmental stress in Fucus serratus and Lemna minoren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalBiomarkersen
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