Beyond using composite measures to analyze the effect of unmet supportive care needs on caregivers’ anxiety and depression

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/621080
Title:
Beyond using composite measures to analyze the effect of unmet supportive care needs on caregivers’ anxiety and depression
Authors:
Lambert, Sylvie D.; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.; Belzile, Eric; Ciampi, Antonio; Girgis, Afaf
Abstract:
Objective: Caregiver research has relied on composite measures (e.g., count) of unmet supportive care needs to determine relationships with anxiety and depression. Such composite measures assume that all unmet needs have a similar impact on outcomes. The purpose of this study is to identify individual unmet needs most associated with caregivers’ anxiety and depression. Methods: 219 Caregivers completed the 44-item Supportive Care Needs Survey and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale [minimal clinically important difference (MCID)=1.5] at 6-8 months, 1, 2, 3.5, and 5 years following the patients' cancer diagnosis. The list of needs was reduced using Partial Least Square regression and those with a Variance Importance in Projection > 1 were analyzed using Bayesian Model Averaging. Results: Across time, eight items remained in the top 10 based on prevalence and were labelled “core”. Three additional ones were labelled “frequent”, as they remained in the top 10 from 1- year onwards. Bayesian Model Averaging identified a maximum of four significant unmet needs per time point – all leading to a difference greater than the MCID. For depression, none of the core unmet needs were significant, rather significance was noted for frequent needs and needs that were not prevalent. For anxiety, 3/8 core and 3/3 frequent unmet needs were significant. Conclusions: Prevalent Those unmet needs that are most prevalent are not necessarily the most significant ones, and findings provide an evidence-based framework to guide the development of caregiver interventions. A broader contribution is proposing a different approach to identify significant unmet needs.
Affiliation:
McGill University; University of Chester; University of New South Wales
Citation:
Lambert, S., Hulbert-Williams, N., Belize, E., Ciampi, A. & Girgis, A. (2018). Beyond using composite measures to analyse the effect of unmet supportive care needs on caregiver's anxiety and depression? Psycho-Oncology.
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Psycho-Oncology
Publication Date:
6-Mar-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/621080
DOI:
10.1002/pon.4696
Additional Links:
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10991611
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Lambert, S., Hulbert-Williams, N., Belize, E., Ciampi, A. & Girgis, A. (2018). Beyond using composite measures to analyse the effect of unmet supportive care needs on caregiver's anxiety and depression? Psycho-Oncology, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.4696. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
ISSN:
1057-9249
EISSN:
1099-1611
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLambert, Sylvie D.en
dc.contributor.authorHulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.en
dc.contributor.authorBelzile, Ericen
dc.contributor.authorCiampi, Antonioen
dc.contributor.authorGirgis, Afafen
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-11T12:42:23Z-
dc.date.available2018-04-11T12:42:23Z-
dc.date.issued2018-03-06-
dc.identifier.citationLambert, S., Hulbert-Williams, N., Belize, E., Ciampi, A. & Girgis, A. (2018). Beyond using composite measures to analyse the effect of unmet supportive care needs on caregiver's anxiety and depression? Psycho-Oncology.en
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.4696-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621080-
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Lambert, S., Hulbert-Williams, N., Belize, E., Ciampi, A. & Girgis, A. (2018). Beyond using composite measures to analyse the effect of unmet supportive care needs on caregiver's anxiety and depression? Psycho-Oncology, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.4696. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.en
dc.description.abstractObjective: Caregiver research has relied on composite measures (e.g., count) of unmet supportive care needs to determine relationships with anxiety and depression. Such composite measures assume that all unmet needs have a similar impact on outcomes. The purpose of this study is to identify individual unmet needs most associated with caregivers’ anxiety and depression. Methods: 219 Caregivers completed the 44-item Supportive Care Needs Survey and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale [minimal clinically important difference (MCID)=1.5] at 6-8 months, 1, 2, 3.5, and 5 years following the patients' cancer diagnosis. The list of needs was reduced using Partial Least Square regression and those with a Variance Importance in Projection > 1 were analyzed using Bayesian Model Averaging. Results: Across time, eight items remained in the top 10 based on prevalence and were labelled “core”. Three additional ones were labelled “frequent”, as they remained in the top 10 from 1- year onwards. Bayesian Model Averaging identified a maximum of four significant unmet needs per time point – all leading to a difference greater than the MCID. For depression, none of the core unmet needs were significant, rather significance was noted for frequent needs and needs that were not prevalent. For anxiety, 3/8 core and 3/3 frequent unmet needs were significant. Conclusions: Prevalent Those unmet needs that are most prevalent are not necessarily the most significant ones, and findings provide an evidence-based framework to guide the development of caregiver interventions. A broader contribution is proposing a different approach to identify significant unmet needs.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10991611en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectcanceren
dc.subjectoncologyen
dc.subjectcaregiversen
dc.subjectfamiliesen
dc.subjectsurvivorshipen
dc.subjectunmet needsen
dc.subjectsupportive cancer careen
dc.subjectanxietyen
dc.subjectdepressionen
dc.subjectintervention developmenten
dc.titleBeyond using composite measures to analyze the effect of unmet supportive care needs on caregivers’ anxiety and depressionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1099-1611-
dc.contributor.departmentMcGill University; University of Chester; University of New South Walesen
dc.identifier.journalPsycho-Oncologyen
dc.date.accepted2018-02-23-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderWork was supported by Cancer Council NSW, Honda Foundation, Hunter Medical Research Instituteen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectInternationally funded researchen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-03-06-
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