Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620509
Title:
Social Capital: A review from an ethics perspective
Authors:
Ayios, Angela; Jeurissen, Ronald; Manning, Paul C.; Spence, Laura J.
Abstract:
Abstract Social capital has as its key element the value of social relationships to generate positive outcomes, both for the key parties involved and for wider society. Some authors have noted that social capital nevertheless has a dark side. There is a moral element to such a conceptualisation, yet there is scarce discussion of ethical elements within the social capital literature. In this paper ethical theory is applied to four traditions or approaches to economic social capital: neo-capitalism; network/reputation; neo-Tocquevellian; and development. Each is considered in detail and subject to ethical analysis by the application of utilitarianism, Kantianism, justice and rights, and ethic of care. Accordingly the assumption that social capital is either value-neutral or a force for good is critiqued and a framework for understanding social capital from an ethics perspective presented.
Affiliation:
Ayios, A. Brunel University; Jeurissen, R. Nyenrode University; Mannin, P. Liverpool UNiverisrity; Spence, L. R., Royal Holloway, University of London.
Citation:
Ayios, A., Jeurissen, R., Manning, P. & Spence. L. J. (2014). Social capital: a review from an ethics perspective. Business Ethics: A European Review, 23(1), 108-124.
Publisher:
Wiley & Sons
Journal:
Business Ethics: A European Review
Publication Date:
30-Jan-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620509
DOI:
10.1111/beer.12040
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/beer.12040/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Ayios, A., Jeurissen, R., Manning, P. & Spence. L. J. (2014). Social capital: a review from an ethics perspective. Business Ethics: A European Review, 23(1), 108-124, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/beer.12040. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving
ISSN:
0962-8770
EISSN:
1467-8608
Appears in Collections:
Chester Business School

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAyios, Angelaen
dc.contributor.authorJeurissen, Ronalden
dc.contributor.authorManning, Paul C.en
dc.contributor.authorSpence, Laura J.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-17T15:38:49Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-17T15:38:49Z-
dc.date.issued2014-01-30-
dc.identifier.citationAyios, A., Jeurissen, R., Manning, P. & Spence. L. J. (2014). Social capital: a review from an ethics perspective. Business Ethics: A European Review, 23(1), 108-124.en
dc.identifier.issn0962-8770-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/beer.12040-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620509-
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Ayios, A., Jeurissen, R., Manning, P. & Spence. L. J. (2014). Social capital: a review from an ethics perspective. Business Ethics: A European Review, 23(1), 108-124, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/beer.12040. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archivingen
dc.description.abstractAbstract Social capital has as its key element the value of social relationships to generate positive outcomes, both for the key parties involved and for wider society. Some authors have noted that social capital nevertheless has a dark side. There is a moral element to such a conceptualisation, yet there is scarce discussion of ethical elements within the social capital literature. In this paper ethical theory is applied to four traditions or approaches to economic social capital: neo-capitalism; network/reputation; neo-Tocquevellian; and development. Each is considered in detail and subject to ethical analysis by the application of utilitarianism, Kantianism, justice and rights, and ethic of care. Accordingly the assumption that social capital is either value-neutral or a force for good is critiqued and a framework for understanding social capital from an ethics perspective presented.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley & Sonsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/beer.12040/abstracten
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectSocial Capitalen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.titleSocial Capital: A review from an ethics perspectiveen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1467-8608-
dc.contributor.departmentAyios, A. Brunel University; Jeurissen, R. Nyenrode University; Mannin, P. Liverpool UNiverisrity; Spence, L. R., Royal Holloway, University of London.en
dc.identifier.journalBusiness Ethics: A European Reviewen
dc.date.accepted2013-11-01-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-01-30-
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.