Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/59813
Title:
What UK graduate employers think they want and what university business schools think they provide
Authors:
Harper, Andrea; Nolan, Terry; Warhurst, Russell
Abstract:
This paper evaluates the increasing focus on the development of students' competencies and skills for management, in university business schools. The debate suggests that deeper understandings, concerning the role of managers are being sacrificed at the hands of an instrumentalist/technicist agenda focusing on competencies and skills. The paper adds to the discussion by scrutinising and applying theory from the literatures of occupational practice, knowledge and learning. Data is presented from sixty four job advertisements stipulating the competencies and skills required of applicants and which illustrate the premium put upon personal practice knowledge. By taking a critical management perspective students can begin to understand the social context and power-based nature of management practice in the workplace. While universities may try to further fulfil the 'narrow', industry-led, competency focus, early indications suggest that universities may possess a good deal of freedom in designing pedagogies supportive of a critical agenda.
Affiliation:
University of Chester ; Auckland University of Technology ; University of Chester
Citation:
International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy, 3(3), 2009, pp. 275-289.
Publisher:
Inderscience Enterprises
Journal:
International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/59813
DOI:
10.1504/IJMCP.2009.023339
Additional Links:
http://www.inderscience.com/browse/index.php?journalID=90
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is tha authors' PDF version of an article published in International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy© 2009. The definitive version is available at www.inderscience.com
ISSN:
1478-1484; 1741-8135
Appears in Collections:
University of Chester Business School

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHarper, Andrea-
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Terry-
dc.contributor.authorWarhurst, Russell-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T09:06:42Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T09:06:42Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy, 3(3), 2009, pp. 275-289.en
dc.identifier.issn1478-1484-
dc.identifier.issn1741-8135-
dc.identifier.doi10.1504/IJMCP.2009.023339-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/59813-
dc.descriptionThis is tha authors' PDF version of an article published in International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy© 2009. The definitive version is available at www.inderscience.comen
dc.description.abstractThis paper evaluates the increasing focus on the development of students' competencies and skills for management, in university business schools. The debate suggests that deeper understandings, concerning the role of managers are being sacrificed at the hands of an instrumentalist/technicist agenda focusing on competencies and skills. The paper adds to the discussion by scrutinising and applying theory from the literatures of occupational practice, knowledge and learning. Data is presented from sixty four job advertisements stipulating the competencies and skills required of applicants and which illustrate the premium put upon personal practice knowledge. By taking a critical management perspective students can begin to understand the social context and power-based nature of management practice in the workplace. While universities may try to further fulfil the 'narrow', industry-led, competency focus, early indications suggest that universities may possess a good deal of freedom in designing pedagogies supportive of a critical agenda.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInderscience Enterprisesen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.inderscience.com/browse/index.php?journalID=90en
dc.subjectbusiness schoolsen
dc.subjectskillsen
dc.subjectcompetencesen
dc.subjectknowledgeen
dc.subjectlearningen
dc.subjectemployersen
dc.titleWhat UK graduate employers think they want and what university business schools think they provideen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester ; Auckland University of Technology ; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophyen
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