Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/48820
Title:
Alleviating perineal trauma - the APT study
Authors:
Steen, Mary; Marchant, Paul
Abstract:
The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of a new cooling device (gel pad) and compare it with a standard regimen (ice pack) and a no localised treatment regimen (control). The study was a randomised controlled trial, initially based in a hospital midwifery unit in the North of England and then continued in the community. Participants were 450 women who had undergone either a normal or an instrumental delivery that required suturing of an episiotomy or second degree tear. The measurements and findings were as follows: 316 (71%) of completed questionnaires were returned. A significant reduction in the levels of oedema was observed in favour of using cooling treatments at day two and day five, p=0.016. p=0.018, and there was a significant reduction in bruising at day ten, p=0.01 (using the Kruskal-Wallis test). Self-reported pain was less in the cooling gel pad group. A significant reduction in pain was demonstrated at day five, day ten and day 14, p=0.023, p=0.007, p=0.058, (Kruskal-Wallis test). A reduction in pain was reported earlier on day two, day three and day five when making a binary comparison of moderate or severe pain, with none or mild, p=0.0038, p=0.037, p=0.017 (chi-squared test). Maternal satisfaction With the cooling gel pad was high and differed statistically significantly compared to the other regimens, p=0.0005, (Kruskal-Wallis test). There were no clinical significant differences monitored between groups when assessing healing. The key conclusions were that this clinical trial confirms earlier findings in a previous study and provides evidence that the use of a specifically designed cooling gel pad is a safe and effective localised method to alleviate perineal trauma, without any adverse effects on healing.
Affiliation:
Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust/Leeds Metropolitan University
Citation:
RCM Midwives Journal, 2001, 4(8), pp 256-259
Publisher:
Royal College of Midwives
Journal:
RCM Midwives Journal
Issue Date:
Aug-2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/48820
Additional Links:
http://www.rcm.org.uk/magazines/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article is not available through ChesterRep.
ISSN:
1462-138X
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSteen, Mary-
dc.contributor.authorMarchant, Paul-
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-10T13:09:33Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-10T13:09:33Z-
dc.date.issued2001-08-
dc.identifier.citationRCM Midwives Journal, 2001, 4(8), pp 256-259en
dc.identifier.issn1462-138X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/48820-
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en
dc.description.abstractThe objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of a new cooling device (gel pad) and compare it with a standard regimen (ice pack) and a no localised treatment regimen (control). The study was a randomised controlled trial, initially based in a hospital midwifery unit in the North of England and then continued in the community. Participants were 450 women who had undergone either a normal or an instrumental delivery that required suturing of an episiotomy or second degree tear. The measurements and findings were as follows: 316 (71%) of completed questionnaires were returned. A significant reduction in the levels of oedema was observed in favour of using cooling treatments at day two and day five, p=0.016. p=0.018, and there was a significant reduction in bruising at day ten, p=0.01 (using the Kruskal-Wallis test). Self-reported pain was less in the cooling gel pad group. A significant reduction in pain was demonstrated at day five, day ten and day 14, p=0.023, p=0.007, p=0.058, (Kruskal-Wallis test). A reduction in pain was reported earlier on day two, day three and day five when making a binary comparison of moderate or severe pain, with none or mild, p=0.0038, p=0.037, p=0.017 (chi-squared test). Maternal satisfaction With the cooling gel pad was high and differed statistically significantly compared to the other regimens, p=0.0005, (Kruskal-Wallis test). There were no clinical significant differences monitored between groups when assessing healing. The key conclusions were that this clinical trial confirms earlier findings in a previous study and provides evidence that the use of a specifically designed cooling gel pad is a safe and effective localised method to alleviate perineal trauma, without any adverse effects on healing.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoyal College of Midwivesen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rcm.org.uk/magazines/en
dc.subjectperineal traumaen
dc.subjectRCTen
dc.subjectcooling therapyen
dc.subjectpain reliefen
dc.subjectpostnatal careen
dc.subjectmaternal satisfactionen
dc.subjectinflammationen
dc.subjectepisiotomyen
dc.subjectperineal tearsen
dc.titleAlleviating perineal trauma - the APT studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLeeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust/Leeds Metropolitan Universityen
dc.identifier.journalRCM Midwives Journalen
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.