"Trust me… I’m a counsellor…”: A heuristic exploration of the therapist’s ability to trust themselves to work effectively and ethically as a person-centred counsellor, and not to fall in love with clients

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/254356
Title:
"Trust me… I’m a counsellor…”: A heuristic exploration of the therapist’s ability to trust themselves to work effectively and ethically as a person-centred counsellor, and not to fall in love with clients
Authors:
Harrison, Mark Thomas
Abstract:
A person-centred counsellor’s use of self may be seen to include offering a non-possessive, and certainly non-sexual, love. For any practitioner, the question arises as to what underpins conformance to professional codes of ethics, both theoretically and personally. Generally, counselling approaches align with professional prohibitions against sexual activity through some combination of predefined techniques and explicit theoretical exclusion. The person-centred approach avoids the systematic use of techniques and the theory might be considered less explicit, and so maybe demands careful consideration. This research thus considers the underpinning which supports how a therapist can trust themselves not to fall in love with clients, and not to engage in any form of sexual exploitation. The research addresses self-trust through a highly reflexive, heuristic exploration of a therapist’s fundamental beliefs. These are discussed in relation to literature on ethics and to counselling theory. What emerges is a greater separation between falling in love and sexual exploitation, supporting a therapist’s ability not to engage in unethical activity with clients and opening the way to greater discussion of such concerns within the person-centred arena.
Advisors:
Mintz, Rita
Publisher:
University of Chester
Issue Date:
Nov-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/254356
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
MPhil / PhD Theses and Masters dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMintz, Ritaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Mark Thomasen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-03T10:10:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-03T10:10:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/254356-
dc.description.abstractA person-centred counsellor’s use of self may be seen to include offering a non-possessive, and certainly non-sexual, love. For any practitioner, the question arises as to what underpins conformance to professional codes of ethics, both theoretically and personally. Generally, counselling approaches align with professional prohibitions against sexual activity through some combination of predefined techniques and explicit theoretical exclusion. The person-centred approach avoids the systematic use of techniques and the theory might be considered less explicit, and so maybe demands careful consideration. This research thus considers the underpinning which supports how a therapist can trust themselves not to fall in love with clients, and not to engage in any form of sexual exploitation. The research addresses self-trust through a highly reflexive, heuristic exploration of a therapist’s fundamental beliefs. These are discussed in relation to literature on ethics and to counselling theory. What emerges is a greater separation between falling in love and sexual exploitation, supporting a therapist’s ability not to engage in unethical activity with clients and opening the way to greater discussion of such concerns within the person-centred arena.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectperson-centred counsellingen_GB
dc.subjectethicsen_GB
dc.subjectloveen_GB
dc.subjectclientsen_GB
dc.title"Trust me… I’m a counsellor…”: A heuristic exploration of the therapist’s ability to trust themselves to work effectively and ethically as a person-centred counsellor, and not to fall in love with clientsen_GB
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMAen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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