Reportage in the lands of the ‘semi-free’: A comparative study of online political journalism in Georgia and Ukraine

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/230251
Title:
Reportage in the lands of the ‘semi-free’: A comparative study of online political journalism in Georgia and Ukraine
Authors:
Roberts, Simon Gwyn
Abstract:
Studies examining the democratizing potential of new media have tended towards a somewhat myopic anglocentrism, which has characterised much of the ensuing debate and therefore failed to fully predict the effects in other contexts and cultures. While the obviously deficient media environment of the Arab world attracted global attention post Arab Spring, and some attempts have been made to examine the impact in other overtly authoritarian regimes, this article argues that the most revealing dynamic is elsewhere: in ‘west-facing’ post-Soviet countries which embrace concepts of media freedom and democracy yet fail to fully implement them. In these media environments, sometimes described as ‘semi free’ (Robakidze, 2011), web access is often very high, partly driven by the failures of the mainstream independent press to capitalise on the post-Communist environment combined with recent limitations on the freedom of the press. Two countries on similar political trajectories, Ukraine and Georgia, are examined in this article. Both experienced so-called ‘colour revolutions’ in the early 2000s, with ‘media freedom’ a fundamental part of protestor’s demands, yet the underpinning cultural context differs considerably. Through the use of immersive interviews with journalists in both countries, the article identifies the emergence of ‘hub websites’ specialising in independent political journalism, around which an engaged and politically active population is coalescing.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
An outline of this work was presented at the 1st International Conference on Emerging Research Paradigms in Business and Social Sciences at Middlesex University Dubai, UAE,22-24 November 2011. An extended version appeared as Online Political Journalism in the Post-Colour Revolution Nations (Chester: University of Chester Press, 2013)
Issue Date:
Nov-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/230251
Type:
Presentation; Other
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Media

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Simon Gwynen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-22T15:09:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-22T15:09:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-
dc.identifier.citationAn outline of this work was presented at the 1st International Conference on Emerging Research Paradigms in Business and Social Sciences at Middlesex University Dubai, UAE,22-24 November 2011. An extended version appeared as Online Political Journalism in the Post-Colour Revolution Nations (Chester: University of Chester Press, 2013)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/230251-
dc.description.abstractStudies examining the democratizing potential of new media have tended towards a somewhat myopic anglocentrism, which has characterised much of the ensuing debate and therefore failed to fully predict the effects in other contexts and cultures. While the obviously deficient media environment of the Arab world attracted global attention post Arab Spring, and some attempts have been made to examine the impact in other overtly authoritarian regimes, this article argues that the most revealing dynamic is elsewhere: in ‘west-facing’ post-Soviet countries which embrace concepts of media freedom and democracy yet fail to fully implement them. In these media environments, sometimes described as ‘semi free’ (Robakidze, 2011), web access is often very high, partly driven by the failures of the mainstream independent press to capitalise on the post-Communist environment combined with recent limitations on the freedom of the press. Two countries on similar political trajectories, Ukraine and Georgia, are examined in this article. Both experienced so-called ‘colour revolutions’ in the early 2000s, with ‘media freedom’ a fundamental part of protestor’s demands, yet the underpinning cultural context differs considerably. Through the use of immersive interviews with journalists in both countries, the article identifies the emergence of ‘hub websites’ specialising in independent political journalism, around which an engaged and politically active population is coalescing.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectpolitical journalismen_GB
dc.subjectjournalismen_GB
dc.subjectInterneten_GB
dc.subjectGeorgiaen_GB
dc.subjectUkraineen_GB
dc.titleReportage in the lands of the ‘semi-free’: A comparative study of online political journalism in Georgia and Ukraineen
dc.typePresentationen
dc.typeOtheren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren_GB
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